Author Archive

Ready, Set, Knit! 395: Kathy talks with Amy Herzog

Saturday, March 28th, 2015
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This week Kathy talks with author and designer Amy Herzog about her newest book, Knit Wear Love.

Ready, Set, Knit! episode 395 - Kathy talks with Amy Herzog- listen now at blog.yarn.com

This book is a companion piece to her first book, Knit to Flatter, and focuses more on helping the knitter understand what kinds of garments they like to make and how to integrate those into their existing wardrobe.

Steve’s Yarn Picks of the week:

Reminder:

Today is the Meltdown! Family book and music festival! Bring the family for a great day at Smith Voc. High School.

You can join in the WEBS Mystery Blanket Knit-A-Long or Crochet-A-Long at anytime, grab the patterns that have already been released and join in the conversation on Ravelry.

Upcoming Events:

Classic Elite Yarns Trunk shows are ongoing and there’s always something new to see! Stop by the store to see what’s on display.

Be sure to check out all of our upcoming Events here.

Mark your calendars, WEBS Tent Sale is happening May 16th and 17th, and don’t miss the 11th Annual Fleece Market on may 16th!

Right click or CTRL+click and Save As to download the MP3 of this Podcast Subscribe to Ready, Set, Knit! in iTunes Subscribe to the Ready, Set, Knit! Podcast RSS Feed

Ask WEBS – changing color in crochet

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015
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Ask WEBS March 24, 2015 - Changing color in crochet. Read more at blog.yarn.com

Changing color in a crochet project can seem like a really tricky bit of maneuvering if you’ve never done it before but it truly is simple! The key is to stop using your old color before you do the LAST YARN OVER of the last stitch in your old color. The last yarn over should be completed in your new color!

Ask WEBS march 24, 2015 - Changing color in crochet. Read more at blog.yarn.com

1. You will start one stitch before your color change actually starts (here we’re demonstrating in single crochet)

2. Insert your hook into the next stitch

3. Yarn over

4. Bring up a loop

Ask WEBS March 24, 2015 - Changing color in crochet. Read more at blog.yarn.com

1. With the new color, fold the yarn over to form a loop, leaving about a 6 inch tail

2. Grab the new color loop with your hook

3. Pull that loop through the 2 loops already on your hook

4. Continue working with just the new color (you can see the new stitch in the new color)

 

And now you’re set up to work over your tails. What do I mean by that? One of the great things about solid stitch patterns in crochet is that you can crochet your stitches right over your tails and not have to worry about weaving them in!

Ask WEBS March 24, 2015 - Changing color and working over tails in crochet. Read more at blog.yarn.com

1. bring the tail of your new and old color across the top of the row of stitches that you’re working into

2. Now hold those tail in place but FORGET that they’re there! Just pretend that they are part of the tops of the stitches in the row below

3. Insert your hook into the next stitch the same way you always do – see how the hook goes under the tails as well?

4. Yarn over your hook, just as you always do. You can see, highlighted in red, that your yarn over has gone over the tails, essentially locking them down to the top of the row below

Ask WEBS March 24, 2015 - Changing color and working over tails in crochet. Read more at blog.yarn.com1. Bring up a loop

2. Yarn over one last time – here you can see that the tails are actually inside the stitch!

3. Once that stitch is finished you can’t even see those tails

4. Keep trapping those tails inside your work for a few inches and you can cut those tails and move along!

Do you change colors this way? Do you crochet over your tails?

 

Ready, Set, Knit! 394: Kathy talks with Liz Sorenson

Saturday, March 21st, 2015
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This week Kathy talks with first time guest Liz Sorenson, owner of Sheep & Shawl in South Deerfield, about the 5th annual I-91 Shop Hop coming up in June.

Ready, Set, Knit! episode 394 - Kathy talks with Liz Sorenson- listen now at blog.yarn.com

At her store Liz focuses on locally sourced yarns and rovings, as well as classes and consignment pieces. The Shop Hop runs June 25th -28th, get all the details here and get your Passport now, 12 shops on the I-91 corridor are waiting to see you! Like our Facebook page or join the All Things WEBS Ravelry group to see all the latest news.

Steve’s Yarn Picks of the week:

Reminder:

Next Saturday is the Meltdown! Family book and music festival! Bring the family for a great day at Smith Voc. High School.

You can join in the WEBS Mystery Blanket Knit-A-Long or Crochet-A-Long at anytime, grab the patterns that have already been released and join in the conversation on Ravelry.

Upcoming Events:

Classic Elite Yarns Trunk shows are ongoing and there’s always something new to see! Stop by the store to see what’s on display.

Be sure to check out all of our upcoming Events here.

Right click or CTRL+click and Save As to download the MP3 of this Podcast Subscribe to Ready, Set, Knit! in iTunes Subscribe to the Ready, Set, Knit! Podcast RSS Feed

WEBS Mystery Blanket KAL and CAL- Square Two

Thursday, March 19th, 2015
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Did you finish all 9 squares from last month?! It’s time to get started on your second set of squares!

Crocheters: We’re combining traditional crochet and Tunisian crochet! And don’t worry, you won’t need a special Tunisian hook for this one. Three strips of Tunisian Simple Stitch are joined together by sections of single crochet and an ingenious joining stitch that leaves NO visible seam! And Tunisian Simple stitch is a wonderful backdrop for embellishments like cross stitch.

The pattern can be downloaded here (FREE) and to help you with those new stitches we’ve put together some video tutorials, there’s even a playlist for the full Crochet-A-Long and all the techniques on Youtube. (Keep in mind that our techniques videos are NOT the pattern! These videos are here to help you understand the techniques featured in our patterns, please refer to your pattern for specifics.)

These small strips of Tunisian crochet are also a great time to practice new-to-you stitches like Tunisian Knit Stitch and Tunisian Purl Stitch, so we’ve included tutorials for those as well.

Once your strips are finished you’re ready to join them together and personalize your squares!

Joining Single Crochet

Cross Stitch on Tunisian Simple Stitch

Knitters: We’re cabling! Nothing too complicated but a finished square with lots of visual interest. We’ll be working 1 x 1, 2 x 1 cables, we’ll show you how to use your cable needle and how to cable without a needle!

The pattern can be downloaded here (FREE) , even if you’ve never cable before you can tackle this one with the video tutorials we’ve put together for you. We even have a playlist for the Knit-A-Long blanket on Youtube to make it all easier. (Please remember that our techniques videos are NOT the pattern! These videos are here to help you understand the featured techniques, you’ll need to refer to your pattern for specifics.)

Don’t be afraid to ask questions and tell us about your progress! You can do that here, on Facebook, on Ravelry, or post pictures of your progress on Instagram and tag them with #WEBSMKAL or #WEBSMCAL

Fiona Ellis – In praise of the humble I-cord

Tuesday, March 17th, 2015
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Designer in Residence Fiona Ellis joins us again this month to tell us all about her love affair with the i-cord, which just happens to be one of the stunning features in her newest pattern release, I Feel Vine.

In the Loop the 2nd design from Fiona Ellis in WEBS' Designer in Residence series - read more at blog.yarn.com

I have loved making the humble I-cord since I was a little girl. Like many of us, I had one of those spool knitting toys. For some reason, & I never knew why, it was called French knitting when & where I was growing up. Mine was like a doll so you needed to make a few inches of cord to be able to see the colour change. It would keep me amused for hours. Then, once I had made yards and yards of the stuff, I would sew it into mats for my grandmother. I even made ones as big as door mats. I graduated to “proper” knitting at age 5 when I was taught by my Gran…maybe she already had enough mats by then. Then in design school I learned that if you set one set of cams to slip on a knitting machine you could make cords even more quickly, and carry on a gossipy conversation at the same time (13 ladies in my studio at the time). In this environment it was called rouleau cord. Once I had made it (and found out who was dating whom) I set about finding creative ways of using it in my designs. That fascination with cords hasn’t left me. When I moved to North America I discovered they were called I-cords in hand knitting circles.

As I delved deeper and deeper into designing cables I saw that adding cords to cables was a perfect marriage. I have experimented a lot with embellishments projects by adding cords mostly to give the knitted-in cable cords the appearance of spilling out of the fabric. If you think about it an I-cord is really part of a cable that hasn’t yet been set into the pattern….or is that just me? Many designs later and too many experiments to count I continue to use I-cords as an embellishment for cable patterns. They can be used as ties, to neaten the front edge of a cardigan, to gather a cuff or lower edge [Re-gathering Intentions], as button loops instead of a button hole, or as belt loops, and in the case of “In the Loop” as a feature at the neckline. Here I imagined the cables separate from the fabric, link around each other before settling back into the neckline.

Collage of designs from Fiona Ellis featuring i-cords - read more at blog.yarn.com

The method for working this is fairly simple: when you reach the stitches that will become the cord (two in this case), you slide them onto a holder such as a safety pin and cast on the same number to the main fabric just like you do when working a thumb on a pair of mittens. Once you are ready to work the cord it is necessary to increase the stitch count from two to four so that it will look the same size as the knitted-in cord. You work the I-cord as usual until it is the desired length, then decrease the stitch count back down to two. To attach the cord you work one stitch from the cord together with one stitch from the fabric – twice. Then all you have to do is weave in the ends.

Just in case you thought I might stop at playing with simple I-cords. A few years ago I began to think; if cords are good, then adding other embellishments to them, such as whimsical leaves used here on these mittens [Woodland Leaves], must be even better!

You can see more of Fiona designs that feature i-cords here and here.

How to Wear It – The Crossroads Pullover

Monday, March 16th, 2015
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As we celebrate National Crochet Month we thought it would be a great time to look a little more closely at our Crossroads Pullover.

The Valley Yarns Crossroads Pullover is made with two squares that grow from the center-out, to create this ingenious and easy to crochet tee.  A draped V-neck on the front and back create a flattering, adjustable neckline as well as cap sleeves, all without additional shaping. Finish it off with four simple seams and you have have a new wardrobe staple that’s perfect for almost any occasion.

Valley Yarns: How to Wear It - The Crossroads Pullover

Crocheted in Valley Yarns 2/10 Merino Tencel you get the benefit of the bounce and memory of the merino paired with the shine and drape of the tencel. Fine yarn and a loose gauge create a sheer, lacy fabric that’s great for layering.

Valley Yarns: How to Wear It - The Crossroads Pullover read more at blog.yarn.com

We’d love to see your finished garments! Anytime you’ve made a Valley Yarns pattern be sure to tag it with #VYwearit We may feature you here on the blog, highlight you on Facebook, or repost you on Instagram!

Ready, Set, Knit! Archives

Saturday, March 14th, 2015
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There’s no show this week as Kathy and Steve enjoy some time with family, but you can check the archives and listen to any one of our almost 400 episodes here.

Reminder:

Shop Hop Bag Day is TODAY March 14th,  present a shop hop bag from any of the past I-91 Shop Hops and receive 15% off your entire purchase! In store purchases only.

Upcoming Events:

American Red Cross Blood Drive, Tuesday March 17th at our Northampton MA retail location – Give on St. Patrick’s day with a donation of blood for those in need! Donate blood or platelets. Give blood and you could help save up to three lives.

There are still open seats in classes with Margaret Radcliffe on April 12, Slipped Stitch Patterns and the Lazy Knitter’s Guide to Pattern Stitches!

Classic Elite Yarns Trunk shows are ongoing and there’s always something new to see! Stop by the store to see what’s on display.

Be sure to check out all of our upcoming Events here.

Ask WEBS – small pin loom squares

Tuesday, March 10th, 2015
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Ask WEBS Feb. 24, 2015 - Using pin loom or Zoom Loom woven squares on the WEBS blog - blog.yarn.com

Pin looms, like the Zoom Loom from Schacht, are a great and portable way to satisfy your weaving itch, they’re also a terrific way to use up scraps of yarn! I hear lots of people asking, “But what can I do with a pile of little 3×3″ woven squares?” and the answer is anything!

Ask WEBS Mar 10, 2015 - Using pin loom or Zoom Loom woven squares on the WEBS blog - blog.yarn.com

From simple coasters and fingerless mitts to bags, cowls, shawls and even sweaters, the possibilities are almost endless. Check out the Looms to Go and Zoom Loom Club groups on Ravelry for great project ideas and support or pick up a copy of Pin Loom Weaving or 100 Pin Loom Squares for even more ideas.

Ready, Set, Knit! 393: Kathy talks with Kennita Tully

Saturday, March 7th, 2015
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This week Kathy talks with first time guest, designer Kennita Tully of Wildflowerknits.

Ready, Set, Knit! ep. 393 - Kathy talks with Kennita Tully - listen now at blog.yarn.com

Kennita started as a photographer and transitioned to textile design with a focus on machine knits but turned to hand knit designs to indulge her love of short rows and intarsia, she even owned a small yarn store for over a decade.

Steve’s Yarn Picks of the week:

Reminder:

Shop Hop Bag Day is next Saturday March 14th,  present a shop hop bag from any of the past I-91 Shop Hops and receive 15% off your entire purchase! In store purchases only.

Upcoming Events:

American Red Cross Blood Drive March 17th at our Northampton MA retail location – Give on St. Patrick’s day with a donation of blood for those in need! Donate blood or platelets. Give blood and you could help save up to three lives.

There are still open seats in classes with Margaret Radcliffe on April 12, Slipped Stitch Patterns and the Lazy Knitter’s Guide to Pattern Stitches!

Classic Elite Yarns Trunk shows are ongoing and there’s always something new to see! Stop by the store to see what’s on display.

Be sure to check out all of our upcoming Events here.

Right click or CTRL+click and Save As to download the MP3 of this Podcast Subscribe to Ready, Set, Knit! in iTunes Subscribe to the Ready, Set, Knit! Podcast RSS Feed

Designer in Residence – In the Loop from Fiona Ellis

Friday, March 6th, 2015
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It’s time to reveal another wonderful design from Fiona Ellis. This time around we have a stunning transitional sweater in a vibrant color that’s perfect to help shake off those winter blues.

Fiona Ellis WEBS 2015 Knitwear Designer in Residence, her second design the In the Loop sweater in Valley Yarns Southwick - learn more at blog.yarn.com

In The Loop is a longer-line fitted top with cap sleeves worked in Valley Yarns Southwick in the rich African Violet colorway. Both the back and front feature an intricate cable pattern that incorporates textured stitches within the loops. And the neckline has a unique I-cord feature which gives the appearance of the cable pattern spilling out of the fabric and looping around on itself, while the cap sleeves have simple rope cables.

Fiona Ellis WEBS 2015 Knitwear Designer in Residence - learn more at blog.yarn.comWear In the Loop with a bold print skirt, pair it with a long-sleeve t-shirt and some khakis, or a flirty floral top that peeks out at the hem and a simple denim skirt. This one is a great wardrobe staple that you’re sure to keep coming back to.