Archive for the ‘Authors & Designers’ Category

The Shenandoah Valley Shawl

Friday, July 22nd, 2016
Share Button

I love a good wrap. A nice wide shawl that I can snuggle into like a great knitted hug is a real comfort, but I don’t necessarily want to look like I’m wearing a blanket. The new Shenandoah Valley Shawl designed by Katharine Malcolm is that perfect shawl! Knit in our Valley Yarns 2/14 Alpaca Silk it is gauzy and ephemeral but amazingly warm and cozy.

The Shenandoah Valley Shawl from Valley Yarns. Learn more about the yarn, the designer, and where you can get your copy of the pattern on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

The silk give the yarn strength and shine, while the alpaca give it that surprising warmth and a soft fuzzy halo. With a decreasing pattern of cables forming a mountain shaped border at each end and a gentle striping effect of stockinette and yarn overs, reminiscent of the rivers and streams, you get to see the best of the Shenandoah Valley in this shawl, the gorgeous Blue Ridge and Appalachian mountains as well as the James and Potomac rivers. And with the bonus of the incredible yardage of the 2/14 Alpaca Silk being offered on cones you will only have 2 tails to weave in at the ends of this project!

Katharine talked to us about herself and how this design came to be.

When did you learn to knit? 

I taught myself how to knit before I was ten years old, a long time ago. The first article I can remember knitting was a woolen turtleneck, shaped, full fashioned sweater with mock cables on the front and the back. I was 12 at the time. In my college years, everyone knit in class. I knit my model train loving fiance a pair of socks with an original train on the side, but never thought of it as designing. The same was true as I knit for my sons and nephews, including whole animal families of hand puppets. It wasn’t until I became a TKGA Master Hand Knitter that I realized that what I had been doing for years was designing. I have been knitting my own designs ever since.

What prompted you to start designing?

I tend to find a design that I want to create in knitting and as I proceed, my ideas grow. That was the case with the Shenandoah Valley Shawl. It started as a project to work on a train trip and as I knit, I did not want it to be the same throughout, so I created the triangles. As I worked the shawl that you see I realized, looking out the window that the color matched the Blue Ridge Mountains. From another window I can see the Appalachian range and the Shawl fit in perfectly. Many of my designs evolve as I knit.

Give us a glimpse into your design process, where/how do you find inspiration?

When I was working towards the Masters Program for The Knitting Guild Association, I decided that since I lived on an alpaca farm, that I would create the yarn for the project. As a result, it was not only an original design for the vest and the long coat, but they were both knit from a one of a kind yarn.

What did you love about the Valley Yarn you worked with?

I loved the feel of the Alpaca/Silk. The silk adds a sheen to the alpaca and I loved working in color. I have been knitting with my hand spun, but none of the alpacas come in Whipple Blue!

The Shenandoah Valley Shawl from Valley Yarns. Learn more about the yarn, the designer, and where you can get your copy of the pattern on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

With a gorgeous combination of lace and cables, this light and airy yet scrumptiously warm shawl could be the perfect accessory, and with almost 30 colors of 2/14 Alpaca Silk to choose from you’re sure to find one that’s perfect for you. Download your copy of the pattern now and cast on!

 

Review & Giveaway: The Knitting All Around Stitch Dictionary

Wednesday, May 11th, 2016
Share Button

We love stitch dictionaries here at WEBS and the latest one to arrive is fantastic. Wendy Bernard’s (of Knit and Tonic) newest book, The Knitting All Around Stitch Dictionary is the follow-up to her popular Up Down, All-Around Stitch Dictionary, and features 150 new stitch patterns for knitting in every direction. Not only does it have the stitch patterns and directions, every chapter includes a pattern so you can put the stitch patterns to use! The book is spiral-bound, which makes it incredibly easy to knit from.

The Knitting All Around Stitch Dictionary by Wendy Bernard

As part of the blog tour, we’re excited to be able to share with you not only a stitch pattern from the book, but also a giveaway of the book and 2 hanks of yarn from Blue Sky Alpacas, who provided the yarn for the book.

First things first, the stitch pattern! The Fern Grotto Lace pattern is a lovely pattern that has directions for knitting flat and in the round, both bottom-up and top-down.

The Knitting All Around Stitch Dictionary Fern Lace Grotto Bottom-Up

Fern Grotto Lace Bottom-Up Flat
(panel of 21 sts +1 worked on a background of St st; 6-row repeat)
ROW 1 (RS): *K1, yo, k3, ssk, k10, k2tog, k3, yo; repeat from * to last st, k1.
ROW 2: P1, *p1, yo, p3, p2tog, p8, ssp, p3, yo, p2; repeat from * to end.
ROW 3: *K3, yo, k3, ssk, k6, k2tog, k3, yo, k2; repeat from * to last st, k1.
ROW 4: P1, *p3, yo, p3, p2tog, p4, ssp, p3, yo, p4; repeat from * to end.
ROW 5: *K5, yo, k3, ssk, k2, k2tog, k3, yo, k4; repeat from * to last st, k1.
ROW 6: P1, *p5, yo, p3, p2tog, ssp, p3, yo, p6; repeat from * to end.
Repeat Rows 1–6 for Fern Grotto Lace Bottom-Up Flat.

Fern Grotto Lace Bottom-Up in the Round
(panel of 21 sts worked on a background of St st; 6-row repeat)
ROW 1 (RS): *K1, yo, k3, ssk, k10, k2tog, k3, yo; repeat from * to end.
ROW 2: *K2, yo, k3, ssk, k8, k2tog, k3, yo, k1; repeat from * to end.
ROW 3: *K3, yo, k3, ssk, k6, k2tog, k3, yo, k2; repeat from * to end.
ROW 4: *K4, yo, k3, ssk, k4, k2tog, k3, yo, k3; repeat from * to end.
ROW 5: *K5, yo, k3, ssk, k2, k2tog, k3, yo, k4; repeat from * to end.
ROW 6: *K6, yo, k3, ssk, k2tog, k3, yo, k5; repeat from * to end.
Repeat Rows 1–6 for Fern Grotto Lace Bottom-Up in the Round.

The Knitting All Around Stitch Dictionary Fern Grotto Lace Top-Down

Fern Grotto Lace Top-Down Flat
(panel of 21 sts +2 worked on a background of St st; 6-row repeat)
ROW 1 (RS): K1, *k5, k2tog, k3, yo, k1, yo, k3, ssk, k5; repeat from * to last st, k1.
ROW 2: P1, *p4, ssp, p3, yo, p3, yo, p3, p2tog, p4; repeat from * to last st, k1.
ROW 3: K1, *k3, k2tog, k3, yo, k5, yo, k3, ssk, k3; repeat from * to last st, k1.
ROW 4: P1, *p2, ssp, p3, yo, p7, yo, p3, p2tog, p2; repeat from * to last st, k1.
ROW 5: K1, *k1, k2tog, k3, yo, k9, yo, k3, ssk, k1; repeat from * to last st, k1.
ROW 6: P1, *ssp, p3, yo, p11, yo, p3, p2tog; repeat from * to last st, k1.
Repeat Rows 1–6 for Fern Grotto Lace Top-Down Flat.

Fern Grotto Lace Top-Down in the Round
(panel of 21 sts worked on a background of St st; 6-row repeat)
ROW 1 (RS): *K5, k2tog, k3, yo, k1, yo, k3, ssk, k5; repeat from * to end.
ROW 2: *P4, k2t0g, k3, yo, k3, yo, k3, ssk, k4; repeat from * to end.
ROW 3: *K3, k2tog, k3, yo, k5, yo, k3, ssk, k3; repeat from * to end.
ROW 4: *K2, k2tog, k3, yo, k7, yo, k3, ssk, k2; repeat from * to end.
ROW 5: *K1, k2tog, k3, yo, k9, yo, k3, ssk, k1; repeat from * to end.
ROW 6: *K2tog, k3, yo, k11, yo, k3, ssk; repeat from * to end.
Repeat Rows 1–6 for Fern Grotto Lace Top-Down in the Round.

And now the giveaway! Please comment here on the blog by May 18, 2016 with what you love about stitch dictionaries for your chance to win. Make sure you use your email address so we have a way to contact you and get your mailing information.

New Yarns from Debbie Bliss!

Monday, February 29th, 2016
Share Button

NEW! Baby Cashmerino Tonals from Debbie Bliss. Read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

Baby Cashmerino has long been one of my go-to yarns when I want to enjoy my knitting as much as the finished baby garments. This Spring Debbie Bliss has introduced Baby Cashmerino Tonals and I’m thrilled by the possibilities of combining these colors with some of my favorite solids.  Never one to disappoint, Debbie Bliss has released a full pattern collection of tiny sweaters perfect for the little one in your life, and this yarn!

NEW! Cotton Denim DK from Debbie Bliss. Read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

If you’re looking to knit for yourself this spring try the new Cotton Denim DK. Not only is it a machine washable, 100% cotton, but it’s available in almost a dozen soft, summer shades. I have my eye on the several of the patterns from the accompanying collection.

And for a little fun in your wardrobe try the two new yarns from Conway + Bliss!

NEW! Cleo from Conway + Bliss. Read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

A soft chainette tube, Cleo feels like t-shirt material! This will make terrific warm-weather garments and accessories in bright, solid colors. Lolli is another chainette-type yarn in bright, solid hues, but with surprise bursts of color throughout! This one will knit up into fun hats, scarves, cowls or other accessories, and there’s great pattern support for both.

NEW! Lolli from Conway + Bliss. Read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

You can read more about these yarns and see lots of pattern ideas in our new Spring 2016 Catalog.

We’re looking for new Valley Yarns designs, from you!

Monday, December 14th, 2015
Share Button

Hello Designers! We are looking for original, never before published, designs for Spring 2016 to showcase four of our favorite Valley Yarns.

Submit your ideas in the April/May Valley Yarns design submission call. read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com Submissions due December 27th, 2015.

For April, we’ll be showcasing two great machine-washable Valley Yarns: Longmeadow, and the brand-new Haydenville!

Think you don’t like knitting with cotton? Let Longmeadow show you cotton in a whole new light. Microfiber blended with cotton gives this yarn some wool-like forgiveness while being soft enough for even the pickiest recipient. A true DK weight, recommended at 5.5 sts per inch, and available in a sunny, colorful palette, Longmeadow is fantastic for baby items and multi-season garments and accessories.

Looking for great softness in a worsted weight, machine-washable and dryable wool? Look no further than our brand new Valley Yarns Haydenville. Mostly merino and blended with microfiber, these 100g/220 yard skeins are perfect for blankets of all sizes and for all recipients who need to machine wash and dry. Large projects, baby sets, stuffed animals, hoodies and other often-washed articles are great for this yarn.

Deadline: Submissions will be due Sunday December 27, 2015 by 11:59pm EST
Designers will be notified if their submission has been accepted, with yarn shipping out, by January 8th. Samples are due in-house by Friday March 4th.

Submit your ideas in the April/May Valley Yarns design submission call. read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com Submissions due December 27th, 2015.

For May we’re highlighting two great warm-weather yarns: Valley Yarns Goshen and Southwick!

Featuring Peruvian cotton, modal, and silk, Valley Yarns Goshen is a luxurious treat with loads of shine. Our heaviest cotton blend, we recommend knitting Goshen at 4.5 sts to the inch for structured women’s garments or dazzling accessories that make use of its weight and drape.

Soft and drapey Valley Yarns Southwick, slightly lighter at 5 sts to the inch, is a perfect choice for flowing, airy garments, accessories and blankets. The combination of cotton and bamboo is smooth and cool on the skin, while the warm and sunny colors can’t help but make you smile.

Deadline: Submissions will be due Sunday December 27, 2015 by 11:59pm EST
Designers will be notified if their submission has been accepted, with yarn shipping out, by January 8th. Samples are due in-house by Friday April 1st.

Submit your ideas in the April/May Valley Yarns design submission call. read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com Submissions due December 27th, 2015.

All accepted submissions will receive yarn support, assigned by our in-house team. Valley Yarns will pay for the finished sample of the pattern on a sliding scale ($50–$200 depending on size and complexity). Payment will be made within 2 weeks of on-time receipt of finished sample. Valley Yarns and the designer will benefit from a 50/50 revenue share of all patterns sales during the exclusivity period, with quarterly payments made to the designer during the exclusivity period, preferably via Paypal.

If your proposal is accepted, Valley Yarns requires a six month period of exclusivity after which rights will be shared and the designer may republish. Valley Yarns will retain their version of the pattern until such a time as they decide to discontinue the pattern or the featured yarn. The Valley Yarns version of the design will be sold only through yarn.com, and may be used in social media and print media advertising, and may be featured in one or more of our catalogs. After the six month period of exclusivity has ended the designer will have full control of the Ravelry page and may use our photography as long as Valley Yarns is credited for the images.

All proposals should be submitted in a one-page PDF format and include:
• your contact information, including your full name, email, mailing address, website and/or Ravelry designer page, and phone number. A short bio is encouraged if we haven’t worked with you before (tell us why you’re great!).
• sketches of your proposed design
• photographs of a generous-sized swatch, it’s not necessary to use a Valley Yarns yarn in your swatch but try to use a yarn with a similar fiber content and stitch gauge
• schematic measurements
• the Valley Yarns yarn you wish to work with
• a short description of the design, including construction, shaping, ease and fit, special techniques and stitch designs
Special reminder, please put everything you want us to see/read into the actual submission PDF, not into the body of your email. Also make sure that all parts of your submission are part of a single pdf.

Please email PDF submissions to:
ValleyYarnsDesigns (at) yarn (dot) com with the subject line: April/May Submissions

If you have questions please contact us at the same e-mail but use the subject line: April/May Questions

You can see past Valley Yarns designs here, and on Ravelry.

FAQ
• Decisions are made and designers with accepted submissions will be contacted approximately one week after the submission deadline. Submissions that are not accepted will be contacted 2-3 weeks after the deadline.
• If your proposal is accepted, Valley Yarns requires a 6 month period of exclusivity, after which shared rights begin.
• You will need to grade/size your patterns, and format with our style guide (will be provided once a pattern is accepted) but they will be tech edited by our excellent team.
• We are primarily looking for knit designs but will never turn away a stellar crochet submission
• You may submit more than one design. Each submission must be in an individual PDF, multiple PDFs may be sent with your submission e-mail
• If you have any questions about sizing and schematic please see the Craft Yarn Council’s Guidelines.

Brief Description:
Valley Yarns is the in-house brand of yarn at WEBS – America’s Yarn Store and at yarn.com, with each yarn named after one of the towns in our beautiful Pioneer Valley. These carefully selected, affordable yarns are perfect for knitters and crocheters.

Oh, So Fast, The Holidays Come…

Friday, November 6th, 2015
Share Button

I went downtown today to run an errand, and what did I see? Evergreen garland being put up on several storefronts and lightposts. It’s just too soon! Every year, I kick about this and nobody listens.

If we’re going to front-load the holiday season, at least let us have beautiful knits to make our holiday crafting better. I got a fun email from our friend Kristin Nicholas with the news that Yankee Magazine, the bible of New Englanders, is featuring some of her holiday patterns as well as the cutest video of her Pom Pom Garlands. This is a craft that can be done by anyone with the dexterity of a 3-year-old with the Clover Pom Pom makers sold in our store. Her Pom Poms are characteristically Kristin, made with her striking color choices.

Colorful holiday gift ideas from Kristin Nicholas on the WEBS Blog. Read more at blog.yarn.com

I always try to point folks making Christmas stockings to Kristin’s Creative Christmas Stockings pattern, available in PDF form. The colors are not what you’d call “Christmas-sy” but to me, that makes them way more appealing. The bright contrasts are as joyful as the spirit of the holidays; and aren’t you all getting a wee bit tired of red, green, blue, and white? Yankee magazine is also featuring Kristin’s Heart to Heart Mittens, which we carry in PDF as well. The word “happy” doesn’t begin to cover how these fun mittens make one feel. Not only does the pattern give you two options, one for one heart, one for many hearts, but Kristin’s clear directions even show the knitter how to embroider the accents onto the mittens before the top is closed, making them even easier to knit.

If all holiday designs could be knit in Color By Kristin yarn, I’d be much less Grinchly. What makes your holiday knitting happier?

Emerging Designer – Marcy Vandale

Friday, October 16th, 2015
Share Button

It’s time for the third and final installment of our  WEBS Emerging Designer series for 2015 with the Got You Covered eBook from Marcy Vandale, who you may know from Steppingstone Fiber Creations. Marcy has put together a collection of wonderful, transitional knits that bridge the gap between the seasons for this eBook. We asked her to tell us a bit her inspiration and designing process.

WEBS Emerging Designer Fall 2015 eBook: Got You Covered, from Marcy Vandale. eBook and individual PDFS now available at yarn.com. Read more on the WEBS Blog - blog.yarn.com

WEBS: When did you learn to knit and what prompted you to start designing?

Marcy: I learned to knit as a freshman in college. There was an upperclassman on the hall who basically had a Lopi yarn shop in her room, needles, accessories, patterns and yarns. I picked out yarn colors and started my first project, an iconic Lopi sweater. I didn’t know anything other than the knit stitch but learned as I went along. By the end of the first semester, I had a new sweater and had started on the next one. Funny, the one thing I never learned anything about until YEARS after I was out of college was gauge! Not until about 10 years ago did I become a Knitter with a capital K as I like to say. I was doing a lot of knitting for my kids and knitting constantly. I started sample and tech knitting and then contract knitting. It was at that point that I decided that I was interested designing my own creations.

WEBS: Give us a glimpse into your design process, where/how do you find inspiration?

Marcy: My design process usually starts with a great yarn. From there, I usually gravitate to designing something I want to wear, whether it be a sweater or accessory. I do love color so I am always looking at great color combos for colorwork. I’m in a purple mood lately.

WEBS: Tell us about your design aesthetic.

Marcy: I am by nature a very practical person and that’s incorporated into how I design. I like to design things I need in my wardrobe or would want to knit, whether it be a garment or an accessory. It’s like gift giving, I always give a gift I’d love to have myself. Because I have a very busy life chasing around after my 4 kids, I tend to design things that are easy to take along to games and on car rides as well as projects I can put down without fear of losing my place. My knits usually are simple but may have one element that may make them seem more difficult or polished, like a simple crochet edging for a neckline. I also am a fan of minimizing finishing work so I design with that construction in mind.

WEBS Emerging Designer Fall 2015 eBook: Got You Covered, from Marcy Vandale. eBook and individual PDFS now available at yarn.com. Read more on the WEBS Blog - blog.yarn.com

You’ll keep your core cozy’s and warm with the Got You Covered VestValley Yarns Deerfield is a perfect fit for this long vest with feature cables and a hidden pocket for your phone! Your toes will thank you for knitting the The Got You Covered Socks, not only does the cable pattern coordinate with the vest but with a pattern that looks complex and works up effortlessly in Valley Yarns Huntington these are socks you’ll have for years to come. Finally the Got You Covered Mittens and Hat pattern, in Valley Yarns Northampton, features colorwork motifs in shades to coordinate with your vest.

Download all three patterns together in the Got You Covered eBook for just $9.99 or download any individual pattern for just $3.99 each. You can find more of Marcy’s designs here on our site, and on Ravelry and don’t forget her collaborative designs with her friend Debbi under Adventures Du Jour. And check out WEBS Emerging Designer Spring 2015 eBook by Angelia Robinson with three stunning crochet accessories perfect for every season. And the Summer 2015 WEBS Emerging Designer eBook: Sproutlet, by Debbi Stone, a beautiful layette set perfect for your little ones.

Design Inspiration with Fiona Ellis – a study of lines

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2015
Share Button

For the blog post this month I’m not going to be exactly “changing tack” but hoping to show you another way that I look at the lines formed by cables. If you have read my blog posts in previous months then you already know about my photo collection. This month I want to show you some photos that I have taken which I think show how a simple line or lines can become really interesting.

Design inspiration for Fiona Ellis, WEBS 2015 Designer in Residence. Read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

Firstly here is a definition of how line is seen as a design principle- taken from an exhibition at the Cooper Hewitt Museum that I saw earlier this year.

Design inspiration for Fiona Ellis, WEBS 2015 Designer in Residence. Read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

When I spot an example of interesting lines I try to move around the subject and take several photos from different angles trying to get shots that play with the way that the lines interact with each other. Here are just a few of them. Do you notice that the carpet pattern (bottom right) combines some of the same combinations of lines as the railway tracks? (by the way it was a dis-used track- I don’t want you to think I was risking my safety to get the shot). The photo in the top left corner is about parallel lines, I love how the spacing between each changes throughout the image.

Design inspiration for Fiona Ellis, WEBS 2015 Designer in Residence - Changing Tack pullover. Read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

Spending some time out in Vancouver by the ocean I started looking at the patterns “drawn” by vessels moving across the water. Now I must admit these observations didn’t become much more than a kernel of an idea. So rather than coming up with my own cable pattern, or re-inventing the wheel, I went back to one of my all time favourite already established cables. This is the smaller one used in Changing Tack. I love how this one zigs back & forth with each cord moving at a slightly different speed to allow them to cross over each other. It reminds me of watching a yacht tack into the wind. Not moving in a straight direct line from A to B, but zig-zaging, all the while aiming towards a specific point. This is where this sweater got its name.

If you have been following my work you will know that I love asymmetry. I know that it doesn’t appeal to everybody and that in some people it can cause him or her to shudder – I’ve seen it happen. But I couldn’t let my year as Designer in Residence go by without including an asymmetric design. So I decided that it needed to be an exercise in subtle asymmetry, one that might even tempt those lovers of symmetry.

Design inspiration for Fiona Ellis, WEBS 2015 Designer in Residence - Changing Tack pullover. Read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

Changing Tack has the patterning arranged so that an even number of small cables is divided, but not in half (symmetrically), rather three placed on once side of the larger cable and just one on the other side. Then I played with the larger cable, changing another tired and true pattern, changing it so that it is no longer symmetrical about the horizontal axis, the upper section does not mirror what happens in the previous rows. I hope that these playful tweaks give just the air of asymmetry without being wildly so. By the way if even this challenges your love of pure symmetry you can always work the pattern by placing two small cables either side of the larger one and mirroring the lower (or upper) section of the larger cable.

I can’t wait to show you what I’m working on for the November pattern release!

Design Inspiration with Fiona Ellis

Tuesday, July 28th, 2015
Share Button

My goodness half of my Designer in Residence year is over and my fourth pattern was just launched! So I just did a quick review of what I’ve chatted with you about over the past few months; geometry, the humble I-cord and Morphing Cables. I guess it’s time I talked a little about how I find my inspiration. The best way I have found of generation my ideas is by taking photographs. Back on Sept 1st 2007 BI – that is “Before Instagram” (I can hardly believe it), I committed to taking photos to illustrate my journals. Up until that point my photo taking was more haphazard, but from that day on I have tried (and mostly succeeded) in taking a photo every single day. This kind of practice helps you develop a more artistic view of the, mostly mundane, everyday things that surround us. Or put another way it forces you to look at things that you see all the time (and mostly overlook) in a new light.

Ironwork - design inspiration for Fiona Ellis, WEBS 2015 Designer in Residence. Read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

As you can imagine I have amassed quite the collection of photos over these past 8 years. And through this process my fascinations have become very apparent. I have become very aware of my re-occurring themes/sources of inspiration. Collar Your Dreams springs from one of my favourites – ironwork, and more specifically the Eiffel Tower. OK you got me…the Eiffel Tower is hardly mundane and everyday, but the practice of looking at those objects transfers into my picture taking when I’m somewhere exotic like Paris.

Design inspiration with Fiona Ellis, WEBS 2015 Designer in Residence. Read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

I’ve used ironwork as an inspiration source many times, but what is a little different with this design is that I wanted to incorporate the openwork feel that the tower, for me, epitomises. It’s not just about the lines, but the spaces in between the lines. There is almost a lightness or airiness to the structure,and that was what I wanted to try to capture. If you have ever been lucky enough to see it up close, maybe it has struck you as it did me, that when you walk around it each vantage point produces yet another beautiful curve or line with amazing geometric shapes nestled in between the main structural braces. So I placed arcs of eyelets holes between the cables, cables that I hope capture something of the graceful lines of this beautiful structure. If you are interested in hearing about my latest fascinations I would love for you to join me on my website on the 9th of each month when I post about what I’m currently finding inspiring. This month it’s all about my recent trip to the UK.

Emerging Designer – Debbi Stone

Monday, July 20th, 2015
Share Button

WEBS Emerging Designer Summer 2015 eBook: Sproutlet, from Debbi Stone. eBook and individual PDFS now available at yarn.com. Read more on the WEBS Blog - blog.yarn.com

We’re excited to bring you the second installment of our WEBS Emerging Designer series with the Summer 2015 Sproutlet eBook! Debbi Stone, who you may know from the Stitches of My Life Designs, has put together a mini collection of everything you need to bring that new baby home in style and keep them warm for the first few years! We’re always excited by Debbi’s fantastic accessory patterns and we couldn’t be happier with these designs! We asked her to tell us a bit about her process and inspiration.

WEBS: When did you learn to knit and what prompted you to start designing?

Debbi: I learned to knit from my grandmother the summer I was 7. She taught me to cast on and knit, no purling, and bind off. That summer I made a lot of garter stitch headbands! A few years back I was looking for a simple cabled cowl to knit for my daughters for Christmas and realized that I couldn’t find what I wanted on Ravelry. I knew how I wanted that cowl to look and how I wanted to construct it so I just started knitting. The next thing you know I had designed my first (very basic) pattern.

WEBS: Give us a glimpse into your design process, where/how do you find inspiration?

Debbi: Someone once referred to me as a “noun girl”. I take my inspiration from the people, places and things in my life. I’ve used everything from relatives, to places I love, and objects of my affection. Once I started keeping my eyes open the world of inspiration opened up to me.

WEBS: Tell us about your design aesthetic.

Debbi: I love to design accessories to pair with a simple, basic wardrobe. I wear a lot of basic black and love to put an accessory on to pull those basics together. I have found that this gives my mix and match wardrobe infinite possibilities, and creates many different looks with the same basic pieces.

The Sproutlet Sweater is an easy, top-down cardigan that you’ll reknit, in each size, every time they outgrow it. Paired with the Sproutlet Hat, and the Sproutlet Blanket, you’ll have one stylish baby ready for that first car ride home or an early autumn family picnic. All three patterns were designed in our line of Valley Superwash yarn, each using a different weight: DK, worsted, and bulky. With 12 colors available in all 3 weights you could make this set in a shade perfect for any baby, from the vibrant Spring Leaf green that Debbi chose to Soft Yellow, Natural or Misty Lilac. Or choose from over 20 other colors and create a set of hand knits in bold tones to gift with your favorite baby accessories.

WEBS Emerging Designer Summer 2015 eBook: Sproutlet, from Debbi Stone. eBook and individual PDFS now available at yarn.com. Read more on the WEBS Blog - blog.yarn.com

Download all three patterns together in the WEBS Emerging Designer, Summer 2015 Sproutlet eBook for just $9.99 or download any individual pattern for just $3.99 each. You can find more of Debbi’s designs here on our site, and on Ravelry and don’t forget her collaborative designs with her friend Marcy under Adventures Du Jour. And check out WEBS Emerging Designer Spring 2015 eBook by Angelia Robinson with three stunning crochet accessories perfect for every season.

Genius is Everywhere

Friday, June 19th, 2015
Share Button

Hey! If you stop by the store through June 29, you’ll see our resident genius designer Emma Welford’s work in a trunk show of some of her many beautiful designs. Emma has worked at WEBS for a few years, as our Purchasing Coordinator and now in the store. She may have helped you pick out yarn or you may have stopped by our Thursday evening Drop-In and had her show you how to pick up stitches or do a decrease.

The Coronation Tank and more designs by Emma Welford on the WEBS Blog - blog.yarn.com

If you check out our website, you’ll see Emma’s new ebook of patterns, “Let Them Knit Cake,” which was released in early spring. It contains what I think is the most beautiful tank ever, the Coronation Tank, knit in Malabrigo Arroyo. The combination of color and texture (the cables making a shapely trim waist and the bright color announcing “summer’s here!” are irresistable. Plus–it’s a tank! It’ll take maybe a week to knit.

Elektrocute and more designs by Emma Welford on the WEBS Blog - blog.yarn.com

All of Emma’s designs are thoughtful and make me want to abandon everything I have on the needles to start her garments. Just when I think I’ve got her figured out (she designs great textural sweaters!) she comes up with something like Elektrocute, a cowl with the most shocking colorwork that looks like it’s not only doable but imperative that it be made.

Check her out on Ravelry, on her blog, and please come to the store to see her trunk show. You’ll be inspired and awed.