Archive for the ‘Designer in Residence’ Category

Designer in Residence – Made to Border from Fiona Ellis

Tuesday, May 5th, 2015
Share Button

With the warmer weather finally starting to settle in we couldn’t be happier to present the latest design from Fiona Ellis, Made to Border! This cute little cap sleeve cardigan is perfect for throwing on over a tank top or light summer dress. The main feature of this design is the border patterning which morphs into gradually diminishing cables. The top is completed with simple edging and a knitted tie closure.

Fiona Ellis WEBS 2015 Knitwear Designer in Residence. Her third design, the Made to Borger cardigan, in Valley Yarns Northfield - learn more at blog.yarn.com

 

Made to Border will soon become your go to layering cardigan! The silk content of the Valley Yarns Northfield gives your stitches shine which enhances your stitch definition, a total plus with cable work, while the baby alpaca give it the softest halo, and the merino ties it all together into a springy yarn that is a joy to knit.

Fiona Ellis WEBS 2015 Knitwear Designer in Residence - learn more at blog.yarn.com

Which of Fiona’s designs is your favorite so far? Which sweater are you working on?

Designer in Residence – In the Loop from Fiona Ellis

Friday, March 6th, 2015
Share Button

It’s time to reveal another wonderful design from Fiona Ellis. This time around we have a stunning transitional sweater in a vibrant color that’s perfect to help shake off those winter blues.

Fiona Ellis WEBS 2015 Knitwear Designer in Residence, her second design the In the Loop sweater in Valley Yarns Southwick - learn more at blog.yarn.com

In The Loop is a longer-line fitted top with cap sleeves worked in Valley Yarns Southwick in the rich African Violet colorway. Both the back and front feature an intricate cable pattern that incorporates textured stitches within the loops. And the neckline has a unique I-cord feature which gives the appearance of the cable pattern spilling out of the fabric and looping around on itself, while the cap sleeves have simple rope cables.

Fiona Ellis WEBS 2015 Knitwear Designer in Residence - learn more at blog.yarn.comWear In the Loop with a bold print skirt, pair it with a long-sleeve t-shirt and some khakis, or a flirty floral top that peeks out at the hem and a simple denim skirt. This one is a great wardrobe staple that you’re sure to keep coming back to.

Doris Chan – a Designer in Residence in her own words

Tuesday, February 17th, 2015
Share Button

Our 2015 Crochet Designer in Residence, Doris Chan, took some time to write about the program, her history with WEBS, and how you can help her decide what Valley Yarns to use next and what to design, over on her website.

The Shawl Collar Stole from Doris Chan, one of six new designs available at yarn.com

About her first design, the Shawl Collar Stole, she says, “Anyone who has wrapped this baby around the shoulders does not want to take it off. Truth be told, I enjoyed the lush softness of the piece while I was creating the sample; this from a crocheter who has allergies, among them wool. Thick yarn, big hook, zero finishing, quick work, nearly instant gratification.”

Have you tried our Valley Superwash Bulky yet?

Fiona Ellis – a Designer in Residence in her own words

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015
Share Button

Artist or designer in residence programs are set up to foster close ties between an artist, their work and a particular establishment or organization. They are devised to allow time & space for the artist to explore their work, maybe even from a new perspective. It helps builds a closer relationship between the artist and the establishment and also allows everyone to see the behind the scenes workings and progress that ultimately leads to the end product. So I was absolutely thrilled when the wonderful people at WEBS invited me to be one of their Designers in Residence. The team at WEBS and I are hoping that our collaboration will foster not only wonderful patterns to showcase their gorgeous yarns, but also give knitters some context to those patterns along with some fun peaks behind the scenes. The pattern that I came up with for the January launch includes three ideas that are part of my designer philosophy or involve an aspect of my work that I have been recently developing.

Shapes & Motifs

Way back in school I hated mathematics. So it amuses to see how much, and with what relative ease, I now use those principles that I struggled so hard to learn. Somehow the fog surrounding them just lifted once I applied them to knitting. Case in point; when I’m designing a shape or motif I lean on simple geometry to figure out the angle of the line. Even a curved line, when you break it down, is in fact made up of the hypotenuse of series of triangles. And you have no idea how smart it makes me feel to be able to say that!

A sample graph for charting stitch increases from Fiona Ellis, 2015 WEBS Designer in Residence - read more at blog.yarn.com

Let me explain a little further. If you need a steep angle for your line you move (add or subtract) by just one stitch at a time each row. If you need a shallower angle (closer to horizontal) then you move by two or maybe three stitches at a time. The real fun begins when you use these angles in combination with each other to create different shapes. I have been using this rule (see how bossy I’m getting about this now) for quite some time to design non-symmetrical, organic looking shapes such as Paisleys. These kinds of shapes, rather than even geometric shapes like triangles, diamonds etc., require the incorporation of several different angles to create the curved line that defines the overall shape. The leaves I have incorporated into the I Feel Vine cardigan are an extension of this experimentation.

A sample chart, with knit swatch, for charting curved lines from Fiona Ellis, 2015 WEBS Designer in Residence - read more at blog.yarn.com

Using needles to changes gauge

I know that you all do gauge swatches. And also follow the instruction that tells you to change your needle size so that you obtain the same gauge that my test knitter used when making the sample. But have you thought about how needle size, along with stitch structure, changes the fabric that you are creating? I know many of you have, and understand the effect, but for those of you who might be new to the concept here is how I used this principle for this cardigan. Apart from allowing for achieving correct gauge, the other cool thing about changing needle sizes is that you can use the changes to create different fabric properties within the same garment. I did this for the ribbed section of the I Feel Vine cardigan. Ribbed fabric is very elastic and causes the fabric to compress widthwise. This is why it’s often used for cuffs when we need a snug fit at the lower edge of a piece. Combining this type of structure with a smaller needle for that section produces a lovely snug, but comfortable, waist shaping without having to change the stitch count at all.

A collage of inspiring floral imagess from Fiona Ellis, 2015 WEBS Designer in Residence - read more at blog.yarn.com

Finishing

For me a project isn’t over until all the little details have been dealt with; the seaming, closures, and finishing details. In some cases I need to take a less is more approach. There is quite a bit of patterning within each garment piece of the I Feel Vine cardigan so to add bulky or attention-grabbing bands I felt would have taken away from the design. I wanted the focus to be on the mid-section & the leaf patterning above. The closure for this cardigan therefore had to be minimal but elegant, so I used a “pick-up & then bind off immediately” trim with button loops that are created during the bind-off.

I do so hope that you like the design and enjoy making (and wearing it).

– Fiona