Archive for the ‘Products at WEBS’ Category

Back To School

Friday, August 28th, 2015
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Even though it’s still hot enough to be annoying, school is in session here at WEBS. Fall classes are available online even as we speak! Fall has always been my favorite season, because I’m way better at starting things than finishing them. Our Handmade Holiday workshops will guarantee that you’ll have a finished project in a day or two; quickly enough that you can make all kinds of gifts and decorations for the last part of fall without breaking a sweat.

Fall classes are open! If you're near to Northampton learn a new skill, master an old one or just have fun making gifts for the holidays. Register in-store now or online at yarn.com Read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

For instance…Amigurumi Halloween Monsters. How cute are they? So cute. This three-hour class teaches the basics of amigurumi (small crocheted figures, monsters, food, etc) and you’ll end up with a Frankie, a Mrs. Frankie, and a baby Candy Corn. Amy Stephens, our resident photography coordinator, will be teaching her very popular Snow Families and Evergreens class, and you may remember those from last year’s Holiday Catalog cover. It won’t take long for you to be enraptured with these fun, simple projects to decorate your home, or give to a special friend.

Fall classes are open! If you're near to Northampton learn a new skill, master an old one or just have fun making gifts for the holidays. Register in-store now or online at yarn.com Read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

We haven’t left out the traditional favorites, either. Challenge yourself with Carol Feller’s Barkentine pattern in Intermediate Sweater Skills. Finally delve into the world of woven cloth in Weekend Weaving. Learn intricate stitch patterns and how to conquer them once and for all in Stitches: Textures. Or whip up a seamless sweater custom-fit to you in Top Down Raglan Sweater from Measurements.

Fall classes are open! If you're near to Northampton learn a new skill, master an old one or just have fun making gifts for the holidays. Register in-store now or online at yarn.com Read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

Our guest instructors are pretty awesome this fall–returning for a second visit is Kate Atherley, author and technical editor at Knitty.com. She’ll be teaching a day of design and pattern-writing skills, as well as showcasing techniques from her new book, Custom Fit Socks. And for spinners, Shannon Herrick from Frabjous Fibers will be here in November to play with 3-D Fiber spinning.

Even if you aren’t near enough to WEBS to take a class, you can choose from tons of great pattern and technique books on our site, or go to our YouTube Channel to learn a new skill! What would you like to master this fall?

I Love Greylock

Friday, August 14th, 2015
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Mount Greylock is located in the far northwestern corner of Massachusetts, abutting New York state. I used to work in that area, and even though a 75-minute commute was horrible, it always cheered me up to see the mountain all four seasons of the year. I hiked the trails on weekends in the fall, when it seemed like I could stand just about any terrible commute for the expanse of nature I was treated to.

Of course, eventually, I had to leave that job because nobody can do a commute like that forever. And now that I’m back at WEBS (third time, see “Hotel California”) I get to see all the new Valley Yarns as they come out onto the sales floor. I have a particular fondness for Valley Yarns Greylock, which is as close to perfect (for me) as a yarn can be.

Valley Yarns Greylock - 100% Cashmere available for a limited time at yarn.com

Greylock is only in the store for a limited time, so snap it up now. There are 27 beautifully heathered colors of this 100% cashmere yarn, wound into generous 300-yard balls. The colors are soft and blendable, and I can’t imagine a single thing that wouldn’t knit up into a gorgeous project. The fingering gauge of 7 sts/inch on a US size 2 needle is perfect for shawls, cowls, scarves, and hats. I will personally be knitting my college-bound son a hat and mitten set in his school colors as he journeys far away. Why not try crocheting the Valley Yarns Pickwick Cowl out of Greylock? It would be the most luxurious garment, perfect as a gift for a special friend or family member…or just keep it for yourself.

What will you knit or crochet with Greylock?

Knitting Through the Years

Friday, July 31st, 2015
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Recently, a friend told me about her mother, a knitter and crafter, who has been having some memory problems. She wants to keep knitting but she has problems counting her stitches, and following patterns if they aren’t right in front of her, clearly marked. It made me think about what we carry here that would be helpful, and I thought I’d let you in on what I found.

Knitting tools to help with memory and keeping track of projects, on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

First of all, the Knitter’s Pride Large Pattern Holder seems like a lifesaver. It’s big enough to hold a pattern straight up, or any series of charts so that you don’t have to keep shuffling papers around (my friend’s mother has NO use for technology, so unfortunately paper patterns are her go-to). The magnetic straight-edge holds everything firmly against the backing, and also can be used as a row marker so she doesn’t lose her place.

The Bryspun Rainbow Rings are great stitch markers; colorful enough to stand out from your stitches, and rubber, so they stay put. They come in a variety of sizes, so they’ll fit on pretty much any size needles. The Clover Split Ring Markers are good for hanging on your stitches; if you have a pattern repeat you can mark it off so that you don’t have to remember where to start or how many stitches are in the repeat. They’re easy as pie to move around, too, so that if you increase or decrease, you don’t need to worry that you’ve lost any stitches.

Everyone’s favorite row counter, the Clover Kacha Kacha Knitting Counter, makes a very definitive CLICK and goes up to 99, which is a lot of satisfying clicking. I’ve used one of these since I started knitting and I’ve never had to replace mine. They last forever. Clover also makes a locking row counts, called a Mini. The beauty of this one is that if it gets pushed around in your knitting bag, it won’t change numbers accidentally. It also has a little loop that you can thread some yarn or string through to  make it a pendant so you don’t forget about it if you get up from your knitting chair to get a cocktail glass of iced tea.

The CocoKnits Knitter’s Keep is the most brilliant thing ever. It’s a slap bracelet (that makes SUCH a satisfying sound) that comes with metal cable needle, stitch markers, all kinds of things you need to keep track of while knitting or crocheting. And you just attach them to your bracelet and it holds it for you. Genius. No more turning around in circles while you try to locate a stray needle.

If you are a crocheter, Addi makes ergonomic hooks that don’t tax arthritic fingers. I’m told that the Knitter’s Pride Cubics needles serve the same function, but I bet there are needles specifically for sore hands and wrists out there.

The last thing I thought might be a great addition to a knitting bag are the Nancy’s Knit Knacks Project Cards. You can note what the project you knit was, for whom it was knit, the start and finish date, and any notes – for instance, if you cut out a set of increases, or made the sleeves shorter. Frankly, I could use these myself, since once I finish a project, I often throw it right out of my mind as I hurtle onto the next knitted object.

What have you seen in your LYS that might help you keep crafting as you age? Because I certainly want to keep crafting!

Couldn’t Be Any Cuter

Wednesday, July 29th, 2015
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Blue Sky Alpacas Royal Petite Baby Knit Kits available for 6 adorable animals. Read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

Look what arrived in the store from Blue Sky Alpacas! These darlings comprise their new Royal Petite Babies Series. There are six knit kits to choose from including Marcel the Monkey, René the Rhinoceros, Lisette the Lion, and Georgette the Giraffe.

We had to show you how adorable these kits are so we made two store samples: Marthe chose to knit Hector the Hippopotamus and Meg decided on Emilie the Elephant. Marthe found the pattern to be clearly written and fun to knit. Now she wants to knit all of them!

Each kit comes complete: everything you need to make the animal of your choosing — the eyes and stuffing are even included! The yarn used to knit the animals is 100% royal alpaca which is the finest grade of alpaca fiber available, making them irresistibly soft. Please stop in soon to see how wonderful these animals are–I bet you’ll be inspired to knit at least one of your own!

Vacation Weaving

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2015
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We have reached the dog days of summer and time for vacation. Days of relaxing on the porch, sipping iced beverages and, of course, creating something with fiber. For many years my projects centered around knitting, mostly because it is so portable. But two years ago my sister hauled her 4-shaft table loom along and I became inspired to venture outside my usual travel boundaries.

Weaving on your summer travels. Read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

Last summer I had just learned to weave on an inkle loom and decided that our family vacation would be the perfect time to learn new techniques and play with ideas. I picked up Anne Dixon’s The Weaver’s Inkle Pattern Directory and packed up my trusty Inklette and some yarn and headed off. I felt pretty confident with the basic warping and weaving, so I chose to tackle something more adventurous and turned to the section on pick up. The book is not only filled with gorgeous, inspiring bands, it gives you multiple design options on a single warp. So I warped it up and started to play with weaving different motifs and patterns. It was fun watching the designs emerge and since it was for sampling, once I got bored adept with one, I’d move on to another. And the best part – when I pulled it off the loom I cut it into sections and gave my family “commemorative” bookmarks from our vacation.

This summer I plan to continue my newly created tradition of learning new techniques and giving family members a handwoven souvenir from our week at the lake. I’m still debating whether to take my Zoom Loom or forge ahead with my newest weaving obsession – tablet weaving. (Who am I kidding? They are both going into the suitcase!)

Do you weave on your vacations?

Inspirational Knitting

Friday, July 17th, 2015
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I’ve loved Blue Sky Alpacas yarns since I first worked at WEBS, lo those many years ago. It’s not just the lovely yarns in soft, clear colors, or the fiber choices, either (alpaca wins my heart, always). It’s the pattern support. They support all the different lines they produce — Spud and Chloe, Royal Petites, Blue Sky…everything is beautiful to look at, functional, and best of all, really fun to knit.

Blue Sky Alpacas Truck Show on display now at WEBS Retail store. Read more on the WEBS Blog - blog.yarn.com

The team at Blue Sky Alpacas just sent us a trunk show, and it’s to their credit that in 85-degree heat and 90% humidity, those wooly garments really got me thinking about what I’d like to wear this fall and winter. To help out, they also sent this video, so that knitters could see how the sweaters, wraps, and poncho work on a human being. Too often, knitted sweaters tend to be lovely to look at but a bit off-putting in the actual wearing. Too tight here, too itchy there, something hits at the wrong place on your body and you spend lots of time tugging it around. While, admittedly, the model in this video is gorgeous, and probably weighs as much as the chocolate bar I ate for breakfast, the sweaters and wraps still look like they would flatter anyone wearing them.

Blue Sky Alpacas Truck Show on display now at WEBS Retail store. Read more on the WEBS Blog - blog.yarn.com

I’m dying to make the Canby Cardi. It satisfies my requirements for a sweater that closes in the front (because I hate things flapping around me) with a cunning one-button design, but it also curves in a way that immediately shapes the waist while somehow making you look polished and stylish. While I wouldn’t necessarily wear a poncho, the Bianca Wrap is comfy and not too voluminous; knit in a neutral plus cream, I would wear it over every shirt I own this fall.

Check out the trunk show if you’re local to our store, and look at our new Blue Sky Alpaca products online to bring a little bit of fall anticipation to your summer!

 

 

Cone Cornucopia!

Wednesday, June 24th, 2015
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Greetings from the Weaving Room! We received a shipment of mill end cones this week and I am having trouble concentrating on my job. This is what happens when you work in the candy shop of the fiber world. I keep making ‘detours’ as I walk through the warehouse and find myself standing in front of these lovelies. My desk is filling with cones in different color groupings, adorned with sticky notes listing yardages, setts and calculations for projects.

It’s always a heady atmosphere when we get mill ends because they are so hard to come by these days. I have 2 coping strategies, but unfortunately they directly contradict each other so I only have a 50-50 chance of getting it right. The first one says – ‘surround yourself with the beautiful colors and feels, give it a few days and maybe you’ll realize that as much as you love it you’re never going to get to that project.’ This strategy has saved many a paycheck (and also led to a few regrets). The second theory goes – ‘this color/hand is stunningly awesome and it’s going to go really fast and if you don’t grab it now it will be gone forever.’ This has led to my embarrassingly large stash and membership in Hoarders’ Anonymous (and some great finds at the year-end guild auctions).

But enough about me! You really just want to know what’s back in that warehouse, right? Okay, this is what we got:

Mill End cones on sale at WEBS - more on the WEBS Blog, blog.yarn.com

 4.1nm Cotton Viscose Mill End is a delightful blend, with a thick & thin cotton core wrapped with viscose. The viscose gives it a beautiful sheen and the varied thickness will add great texture to your weaving. Suggested sett is 20-28 epi, but remember to always weave a sample before starting your project. 54% Cotton/46% Viscose. 18 colors

$12.99 by the cone, full cones only. Cones weigh approximately .55 lb., with ~1320 yards.

30s Yorkshire Wool Mill End on 250g cones is a finely spun, 100% wool, single ply weaving yarn with a spectacular range of colors including some rich, heathery shades. The fine weight will weave up into beautiful yardage for garments as well as lightweight throws, blankets and more. Recommended sett is 30 – 35 epi, but remember to always weave a swatch before starting your project.  55 colors

$12.99 by the cone, full cones only. Cones weigh approximately .55 lb., with ~4224 yards.

2/16 Lambswool Mill End is not only gorgeous, soft and cozy, but it boasts some incredibly rich heather shades that will add depth and color to your weaving. This 100% wool yarn comes on 250g cones. Recommended sett is 24-30 epi, but make sure to always weave a sample before starting a project. 28 colors

$12.99 by the cone, full cones only. Cones weigh approximately .55 lb., with ~2464 yards.

9.4nm Wool Nylon Mill End 250g weaving yarn is a springy, tightly spun blend of wool with a little nylon. It has great texture – almost like a bouclé – and is available in a lovely array of colors. We see this working as a wonderful weft yarn, used alone or in combination with other yarns. Use as warp only with great care as it’s rather stretchy. Always weave a sample before starting a project. 93% wool/7% nylon. 56 colors.

$13.99 by the cone, full cones only. Cones weigh approximately .55 lb., with ~2475 yards.

3.5nm Flan Mill End is a fun yarn on 250g cones that’s 100% cotton, and will provide lots of interest and texture to your weaving. It’s got a zig-zaggy texture throughout, with variations in thickness, almost like a flake. Recommended sett is 16-24 epi, but remember to always weave a swatch before beginning your project. 40+ colors

$12.99 by the cone, full cones only. Cones weigh approximately .55 lb., with ~957 yards.

Mill End cones on sale at WEBS - more on the WEBS Blog, blog.yarn.com

The two wools have me thinking of yardage for a winter coat, while the 3.5nm cotton is jumping up and down, begging to be combined with an 8/2 or 6/2 cotton for textured snuggly baby blankets. What can you see weaving with these yarns?

I-91 SHOP HOP IS AROUND THE CORNER!

Thursday, June 11th, 2015
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If you haven’t participated in the Shop Hop in the past years joining in is super easy, all you need is $5 to purchase your passport and a sense of adventure! The I-91 Shop Hop runs Thursday, June 25th through Sunday, June 28th and you can purchase a passport at one of the 12 shops participating this year, and you still have time to purchase your 2015 passport! We are looking forward to welcoming more than 300 Shop-Hoppers to our store over the weekend.

The Annual I-91 Shop Hop is just around the corner. Get your passport now! Read more at blog.yarn.com

Why participate in the Shop Hop? At each store you visit your name will be entered in the daily prize drawing. Each of the daily prizes contains a variety of wonderful yarns, patterns, needles and accessories. Once you’ve visited all 12 shops and have your passport stamped just turn it in at the last shop on your trip and you will be entered into a grand prize drawing! On Sunday, there are two drawings: the daily basket and a chance to win a wooden swift and ball winder.  As an added bonus, each shop will have a special knit kit for sale just for Shop Hop! So be sure to hit all the shops during the long weekend and keep your fingers crossed for the daily prize and grand prize on Sunday. Hope to see you then!

The Annual I-91 Shop Hop is just around the corner. Get your passport now! Read more at blog.yarn.com

Participating Shops:
Green Mountain Spinnery- Putney, VT
Handknits- Brattleboro, VT
Sheep & Shawl-South Deerfield, MA
Northampton Wools, Northampton, MA
WEBS America’s Yarn Store-Northampton, MA
Marji’s Yarncrafts-Granby, CT
Creative Fibers-Windsor, CT
Village Wool-Glastonbury, CT
Country Yarns-Wallingford, CT
The Yarn Barn,LLC-Woodbridge, CT
Knit New Haven-New Haven, CT
The Yarn Basket-Branford, CT

Reading for Inspiration

Wednesday, June 10th, 2015
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Greetings from the Weaving Room! I love books and my personal reference library is full of everything from pattern dictionaries to technique books, structure-focused tomes and classics from weaving icons. I keep an eye out for new books coming in to the store, looking for inspiration and education.

I have found myself restless of late, yearning for my weaving to be more than just squares and rectangles. And then…..Simple Woven Garments, by Sara Goldenberg and Jane Patrick arrived this spring. Filled with gorgeous photography and layouts, this book is a great springboard into the world of sewing handwoven cloth. The project photos, of course, fall into the category of eye candy but I really loved that they took equal care in providing detailed, close up photos of techniques. Another nice feature is the use of side bars with suggestions for other fabric ideas and alternate styles. I’m a big fan of projects that encourage you to say “what if” and offer suggestions for making it uniquely your own.

The book starts with an introduction to sewing handwovens with information about shaping, sizing, cutting and sewing. I found the techniques to be simple and a great place to start (as opposed to feeling faint and intimidated at the thought that I need to learn French seams right away!). All the projects can be woven on either rigid heddle or shaft looms and the authors discuss the considerations for using one or the other. Some of the projects also incorporate knitting and I gotta say I love a good bi-craftual project.

Flame Lace Top from Simple Woven Garments by Sara Goldenberg & Jane Patrick - read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

Of course I checked to see which projects used WEBS/Valley Yarns and found the Flame Lace Top with 8/2 Tencel and Variegated 8/2 Tencel combined as the weft. I love the lacy texture of the weave and the clever pulled threads to provide shaping. I wasn’t sure, however, that the blouson look  was for me. After reading suggestions in the “Alternate Styles” box, I realized I could make one of those long open vests I’ve been coveting by increasing the length and cutting it down the center front (and perhaps making an inkle facing?). I could also use Valley Yarns 5/2 Bamboo for the warp (single stranded) to give it that wonderful drape……………

See, this is what happens when you read books – you get inspired and start to dream of what you can create!

And to further inspire you, Jane Patrick will be in town this summer to teach at NEWS (New England Weavers Seminar) and she will be signing books in our booth (bottom floor of the Campus Center at Smith College) on Thursday, July 9th from 6:30 – 7:30 pm. We will have Simple Woven Garments in addition to her other books – The Weaver’s Idea Book and  Woven Scarves. We hope you can join us!

I Love a Good Mystery

Wednesday, June 3rd, 2015
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I don’t know about you, but my summer knitting seems to consist mostly of MKALs (Mystery Knit-a-longs). There’s something about the surprise that is more appealing to me during the warmer months than any other time of year. I like having a pattern handed to me in chunks. It also sometimes helps me to finish sections, since I know the next one is coming.

Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light

There are several MKALs starting up (or that have recently started) that I’m already signed up for, or thinking of signing up for. Kirsten Kapur’s Through the Loops Mystery Shawl 2015. I have quite the stash of Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light that I’m planning on going through and choosing two colors to make this shawl. It’s one of my favorite yarns for shawls, so I’m excited to get going on this one.

The Fibre Co. Meadow

Next up is the Hydrangea MKAL 2015 by the fine folks from Kelbourne Woolens in The Fibre Co. Meadow. I did their MKAL last summer that featured Meadow and I loved it. They include great tips on the different techniques, so it’s awesome if you’re trying to pick up new skills and really learn something. I’m still trying to decide on a color though. After the winter we had, I still don’t want any dull or netural colors, but the Queen Anne’s Lace is calling to me!

The Shetland Trader MKAL is also appealing to me. I like that it’s more of a focus on texture than on lace. Gudrun Johnson designed one of our 40th Anniversary patterns, Valley Yarns 40th Anniversary 14 Tirrick Shawl, and this one is still on my to-knit list. I just love the pattern and I have no doubt that Gudrun’s MKAL would be a fun one. Maybe in three colors of Valley Yarns Charlemont?

So, what do you think about MKALs? Are they something you’re interested in? Obviously from my three picks, I’m a shawl knitter, but there are lots of other MKALs out there. What is your ideal MKAL project?