November 18th, 2012

Sebastian Gloves Knitalong – Week 2

Share Button

So is everyone ready to get started knitting their Sebastian Gloves? I’ve been working on the Ribbed Cuff Version and have really been enjoying having a portable knitting project again.

First off, I’d like to answer a couple of questions people have had on social media this past week. Some of you may be having the same questions.

1. “I’m not very good at knitting on double pointed needles. Would it be possible to magic loop these?” Absolutely! I would suggest knitting the gloves using your favorite small-diameter circular knitting method. I started out knitting my glove on DPNs, but once I got to the cable portion, I found it easier to knit on two circular needles. With this cable pattern, I didn’t like having a cable cross between two double pointed needles. With two circulars or the magic loop method, it’s easy to have each cable portion on a separate needle.

2. “I don’t want the cable pattern on the inside of the glove. If I recall, cable draws the fabric in compared to the same number of stitches in stockinette. If that’s true – is there a way to figure out how much I’d need to reduce the number of stitches on the inside without knitting it, measuring it, and pulling it out?” Kristin Nicholas‘s response to this question: You would have to figure out your stockinette gauge and substitute in. You would also have to adjust the finger stitch numbers for pickup. The reason I put the cable on both sides is because if a glove is the same on the front and back it can be worn on both hands. The gloves I have that are either right or left handed always wear out on the right hand first. You can swap the gloves between hands so they will wear evenly and you won’t have to re-knit the fingers so often.

3. “Is there a fingerless version of these?” or “Wonder if I could make these as mittens instead of gloves?” If you want to make a fingerless version, there has been suggestions to bind off after the last reverse stockinette ridge or to stop knitting the fingers at the first knuckle. If you want to make mittens, I would suggest skipping the last reverse stockinette ridge and continuing the cable pattern. Follow a basic mitten pattern to shape the top. But you’ll have to do some extra work figuring out how to end the cable pattern.

Now let’s get knitting! Below, you’ll find some notes, links to video tutorials, and tips as you knit the gloves.

Cast On – I just used my go-to Long Tail Cast On. Unless I need a really stretchy cast-on edge, I use this most of the time.

Needles – If you’ve never used DPNs before or need some tips, check out our Knitting in the Round on DPNs video.

Changing Colors – If you’ve never changed colors in your knitting, check out our video on How to Add a New Color to Your Knitting.

Ribbed Cuff – For the first row of ribbing in the ribbed cuff, I would suggest knitting all stitches. If you do the ribbed pattern on the first row, you’ll get a messier transition between the color change (see photo at the right). I ripped back and reknit this row. Check out our tutorial on how to knit clean stripes in ribbing for more explanation.

Knitting Cables – I love cables because they add a lot of fun texture and look a lot more complicated than they really are. If you’re a cable newbie, watch our How to Knit Cables video before starting the cable section. One of my favorite tools to use to keep track of where I’m at in a cable chart is highlighter tape. Really, it’s awesome. You can see it in use here. But sticky notes work really well too.

Marking the Thumb Gusset – Later in the glove, you’ll need to measure from the beginning of the thumb gusset, to where you knit the last reverse stockinette ridge. For ease of measuring later, I would suggest slipping a locking stitch marker in the middle of the cable pattern of this row. It’s easier to see where the thumb gusset begins.

Knitting the Thumb Gusset – You’ll be using a Make 1 stitch (M1) to create the thumb gusset. For a refresher on how to knit Make 1 Increases, watch this video.

Once you’ve knit the thumb gusset, you’ll hold the thumb stitches on waste yarn and continue knitting the rest of the glove hand. You’ll need to knit until the hand measures a certain amount from the beginning of the thumb. Don’t make the mistake that I made and measure from where you put the thumb stitches on waste yarn. You’ll need to measure from the beginning of the thumb gusset. So I had several rows I had to unknit. And unknitting cables is definitely harding then knitting them. Learn from my mistakes.

That brings us to the last reverse stockinette ridge. We’ll pick up there next week. Now take a moment, slip on your glove, and take a picture. Looking good so far I bet. Share your progress on our Ravelry page here. I’d love to see everyone’s color choices and gloves so far. I’m knitting the small size, which is a little snug for my hand.

If you get stuck, please post your questions in the comments.

Happy Knitting!

- Dena

 

Follow WEBS

Dena

Ecommerce Marketing Manager at WEBS - America’s Yarn Store
Dena started working at WEBS in 2006, shortly after she learned to knit. She also dabbles in crochet and weaving. She finds knitting complements her marathon and triathlon training really well.
Follow WEBS

Tags: , ,

  • http://www.sanderellas.com/ Sandra

    Those are beautiful gloves! I don’t knit, wish I did…just crochet…but these are stunning!! I love them!