Posts Tagged ‘crochet patterns’

Celebrate Crochet! Amigurumi

Wednesday, March 13th, 2013
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It’s National Crochet Month and we’re excited to share some of our favorite crochet techniques and trends happening in 2013. This week we’re focusing on Amigurumi, or small crocheted animals.

With Spring only a week away and Easter at the end of the month you have just enough time to create some great little gifts for the children in your life.

Amigurumi Cosy by Lan-Ahn Bui and Josephine Wan has some wonderful seasonal animals from bunnies to sheep and even an adorable snail.

Amigurumi World by Ana Paula Rimoli is one of my favorites! I’ve made tons of the Happy Eggs and the tiny duckling is adorable.

We have our own versions of these little stuffed animals, try the free Valley Yarns patterns for a bunny, lamb, robin and chickens!

Valley Yarns Valley Superwash and Valley Superwash DK are the perfect yarn for projects like these, they’ll be soft and washable and you have a great range of colors to choose from.

Have you crocheted any stuffed animals? What’s your favorite?

A Heartfelt Valentine

Monday, February 4th, 2013
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Knitting and Crochet are a huge part of our lives here at WEBS and this year we wanted to bring them together for a quick Valentine’s Day project that is accessible to everyone from the most advanced to newest beginners. Valley Yarns Pattern #526 Heartfelt Coasters.

With just 3 skeins of our Valley Yarns Northampton Sport you can make 6 coasters with enough yardage left over for quite a bit of embellishment.  Here you can see Kirsten’s mug on her basic coaster and mine on my fancy one. Kirsten knit hers and I crocheted mine, then we swapped hearts, so each of our coasters contains knit and crochet! All it takes is two simple squares, knit or crocheted, that have been felted. Cut out a heart shape from the center and swap the hearts, then sew them back into place in their new home.

For the sewing you’ll need an embroidery needle with an eye big enough to accommodate the yarn and a tip sharp enough to pierce your felted square, as well as the third color of Northampton Sport. Here I have a square in natural and a heart in burgundy, so I’m using the merlot heather to sew everything together.  And don’t worry if your heart doesn’t fit exactly into the cut out space, your stitches should pull everything together nicely. If you’re feeling fancy you can do a blanket stitch around the edge and then add a decorative crochet border.

Swap hearts with a friend or get your knitting group/circle to swap hearts.

Ready, Set, Knit! 298: Kathy talks with Kristin Omdahl

Saturday, February 2nd, 2013
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Guest: Kathy and Kristin talk about The Finer Edge: Crocheted Trims, Motifs & Borders, Kristin’s newest book.

The book began as a seasons worth of project ideas for Knitting Daily TV and there was so much to work with that it made sense to turn it into a great reference book for edgings and borders.

The book is divided into sections for edgings worked from the top down, the bottom up and side-to-side. There is also a pattern section featuring garments and accessories where the fabric is actually constructed from edgings!

Kathy loves the Luxor Blanket and the Palmira Shawl crochet in our own 2/14 Alpaca Silk.

Finer Edge Giveaway!

Leave a comment on our post as well as on Kristin’s Blog to win a signed copy of The Finer Edge as well as a Prize pack containing the yarn and hook to make the Palmira shawl, a bottle of Eucalan in Kristin’s Wrapture scent and a $25.00 WEBS Gift Card. Comments are open through Thursday, Feb. 7th and the winner will be announced here on Saturday Feb 9th.

Steve’s Yarn Picks

Reminder: Pre-Game Sunday Escape, tomorrow, Feb 3rd from noon-4:00PM

Upcoming Events: 

February 15-18 Debbie Stoller will be at the Rowe Conference Center for a weekend long workshop: Raging Wool

Monday February 18th Debbie Stoller will be at WEBS from 3-5pm! She’ll be teaching a one hour lace workshop and then signing books. The class is free but Registration is required.

Two weeks from today, on Feb 16th, we will air Show #300! To celebrate we will be giving away three $300 gift cards. You must be on the e-mail list to participate, join here. We will be e-mailing a short survey, this Tuesday –  February 5th,  and filling it out will enter you in the contest. The winners will be announced on the 300th episode.

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The Finer Edge Giveaway

Saturday, February 2nd, 2013
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 We’re pairing up with one of our favorite designers, Kristin Omdahl, to give away a signed copy of her newest book, The Finer Edge!

We’ll also be giving away a bottle of her Wrapture scent from Eucalan, a cone of our 2/14 Alpaca Silk (to make the Palmira Shawl featured in the book), a Knitter’s Pride Dreamz Crochet hook: US size E/4/3.50mm, and a $25 Gift Certificate to WEBS.

Just leave a comment here and on Kristin’s Blog letting us know why you’d like a copy of the book. All comments must be posted by 11:59PM  EST on Thursday, February 7th to be entered to win. We’ll announce the winner on the blog on Saturday Feb 9th.

31 Days to Get Organized: Keeping Track of Your Pattern Library

Sunday, January 20th, 2013
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Many of you have discovered that Ravelry works really well for keeping track of your pattern library. This is especially true if most of the books, magazines, and patterns that you have in your library are from the recent past. Patterns are added to Ravelry by members. There are almost 340,000 individual knitting and crochet patterns on Ravelry! And over time, more and more older patterns are being added to Ravelry in addition to most new ones.

But what if you don’t use Ravelry or have A LOT of older patterns in your library that don’t exist on Ravelry yet. You may be looking for an alternate solution for keeping track of what you have in your library.

During this blog series, people have been raving about Evernote in the comments. It sounds like it’s an easy way to keep track of all of your knitting and crochet life, including what patterns you own. Because there are Evernote apps available for you mobile device, you can have access to it anywhere. If you’re interested in learning more about Evernote, check out this blog post, Evernote for Knitting: How Jennifer Lathrop Keeps Her Patterns and Needles Organized. Don’t worry, it applies to crocheting too.

I used to use Delicious Library to catalog our music and books. This allows you to upload your media to your library by scanning the barcodes. It’s easy to use, and may be a good option if you just want a list of all of your knitting and crochet books, but it won’t let you organize the individual patterns from the books.

One question to ask yourself is WHY you want to keep track of all of your patterns. Do you get frustrated looking for just the right pattern, or find it takes a long time to find the specific pattern you’re looking for? Then coming up with some kind of tracking system might make sense for you. Maybe you mostly find that you’re always searching for a new baby project, but not much else. It’s perfectly reasonable to go through your collection and just catalog the baby patterns you have in your library. This may be a good tip for someone who is overwhelmed by the size of their library, and can’t imagine cataloging everything, thus keeping them from even starting.

No matter what way you use to keep track of your pattern library, don’t feel compelled to enter every pattern you own. I’m a type ‘A’ person, so sometimes I want to track everything, even though I don’t need to track it all. I would recommend tracking only the patterns you actually want to make someday. Don’t feel compelled to list every pattern from a book or magazine. That takes a lot of time. And wouldn’t you rather be spending some of that time knitting and crocheting?

So, do you prefer to flip through your books and magazines to find your next pattern to knit or crochet? Or do you prefer to catalog every pattern and have access to your whole library when you’re out shopping at your local yarn store?

31 Days to Get Organized: Digital Patterns

Saturday, January 19th, 2013
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In the last few years there has been an enormous increase in the number of patterns, magazines and books available in digital format. There are a lot of advantages of digital patterns over paper patterns.

  • They take up less physical storage space.
  • Some digital versions are cheaper than the paper version.
  • Some patterns are only available digitally.
  • You can download them instantly. No waiting.
  • If a pattern has errata (errors or updates), it’s much easier for the designer to update the pattern.
  • If you own an iPad, eReader, or tablet, you can carry your digital library wherever you go.
  • If you prefer to work from a hard copy, you can print out a copy of a digital pattern as many times as you need to, taking notes on the copy as you work through the pattern.
  • You may find that a digital pattern will have additional content such as extra notes from the designer and quick links to relevant websites, tutorials, and instruction videos.

With the increase in availability of digital knitting and crochet patterns (WEBS carries over 16,000 downloadable knitting and crochet patterns and eBooks!) and the ease of purchasing and downloading them, you may have discovered you suddenly have a lot of files floating around your computer.

First thing I would suggest if you haven’t done so already, is to have all of your files live in one place on your hard drive. You might have some in folders, but there might be others sitting on your desktop or downloads folder. Once you’ve moved them into one parent folder such as Knitting, Crochet, or Crafts, start creating subfolders if you have more than a few pattern files. Create similar sub-categories that you use for organizing your single patterns. I mostly like to organize my digital patterns by designer, but it might make more sense for you to sort by type of project. It depends on what’s in your digital pattern library.

In addition to patterns, I store other files related to knitting and crochet here such as tips, files I need for my blog, and customized graph paper.

If you have an iPad, eReader, or tablet, there are apps available (Adobe PDF Reader, Goodreader, iBook) that let you view your pattern PDFs on your device. There are even some apps (Remarks) that allow you to annotate PDFs, perfect for making notes or tick marks as you work through a pattern.

If you don’t want to store your PDF files on your device and want access to all of your pattern files on any of your devices, consider using a cloud-based solution such as Dropbox or Google Drive.

Many of you also purchase digital patterns and eBooks through Ravelry. This is a good option since you don’t need to download purchased patterns until you’re ready to use them. Ravelry does a nice job of incorporating these patterns into your Ravalery pattern library.

Share some of your favorite tips and solutions for managing your digital knitting and crochet patterns. 

– Dena

31 Days to Get Organized: Organizing Your Single Knitting and Crochet Patterns

Thursday, January 17th, 2013
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Yesterday’s task of going through all of your knitting and crochet books, pattern books and magazines was a big one. Some of you were overwhelmed by it or didn’t have the time to work on it. No worries. We’ll continue working on our our patterns through the weekend. And remember, don’t feel like you have to keep up with each task every day. Do the tasks you feel like you need to work on. And come up with your own schedule. I suggested to someone yesterday that instead of 31 Days to Get Organized, make it 31 Weeks to Get Organized, one task each week. This blog series will be waiting for you when you’re ready.

Now moving onto today’s task of organizing our single patterns. First step is to go through all of them and figure out what to keep and what to get rid of. Some things to consider while you’re sorting through your patterns:

  • Is this a duplicate copy of a pattern? Do I have this in a book or magazine?
  • Do I have an electronic version of this pattern that can take the place of the hard copy?
  • Do you not like the pattern anymore?
  • Did you start the pattern, got stuck, too hard to follow, or lost interest?
  • Have you already made the pattern and won’t make it again?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, the pattern might belong in the get rid of pile.

Next step is to figure out how you want to sort your patterns.

  • By date, newest in front or newest in back
  • By designer or company
  • By craft – knitting and crochet
  • By completion – finished but will make again in one section, haven’t started yet in another section
  • By type of garment – sweaters, blankets, hats, etc.

Once you have an idea how you want to sort your patterns, you’ll have a better idea how you want to store them. I used to store mine in 3-ring binders. Now I’ve switched to hanging files. Here are some examples of ways people organize their patterns.

  • Hanging Files – easy to put away patterns, but files can get messed up more easily
  • 3-Ring Binders (with patterns in plastic sleeves so you don’t have to punch holes in your patterns) – keeps your patterns well sorted, but takes more time to pull out a pattern and put it back
  • Magazine Files – basically a vertical pile, but if you don’t have many patterns, very easy to set up
  • Expanding Files – a lot like hanging files but more portable, but also more difficult to change your categories
  • 2 Pocket Folders – could work well stored in magazine files
  • Digital copies – scan your patterns to create digital copies (more on organizing digital patterns this weekend), then store your hard copies in a box out of the way

When deciding on a method to sort and store your single patterns, consider the size of your collection, if space is an issue, how easy you want retrieval to be, and the ease of keeping your system up to date and organized.

What’s your favorite way to organize your knitting and crochet patterns?

31 Days to Get Organized: Organizing Your Craft Books, Magazines, & Pattern Books

Wednesday, January 16th, 2013
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Wow! We’re just about halfway done with organizing our knitting and crocheting lives. I’ve been impressed with all of the work you’ve been doing so far this month. Great job everyone!

Next up we’re tackling our knitting and crochet patterns. Today we’re going to sort through our books, pattern books, and magazines – all those patterns we might keep on a bookshelf. We’ll cover organizing single patterns tomorrow and digital patterns and eBooks on Saturday.

Gather Your Stash

If your bookcases are overflowing with knitting books, craft magazines, and crochet patterns, today’s task is perfect for you. Start by pulling all of your craft books, pattern books, and magazines off of your shelves. You might have these spread all over the house. Some of them may be hiding in a stack on a table or desk. Collect them all into one place.

Pre-Sort Your Stash

If you have a sizable collection, do some pre-sorting as you’re pulling everything together. Don’t spend too much time with this step. Don’t start flipping through the pages yet. This will slow you down. Just start stacking in broad categories like pattern booklets, magazines, knitting books, crochet books. This will speed up your finer sorting stage later. Also if you need to break up today’s task over a few days, it’ll be easier to sit down one day and just tackled magazines for example.

De-Stash

Now it’s time to make some decisions. What are you going to keep and what are you going to get rid of? This is going to feel a little like when you were de-stashing your yarn – keep, give away, toss. Keep anything you think you will use someday. I have a rule for myself I try to follow. If a book, magazine, or pattern book doesn’t have at least 3 patterns that I will make someday, I get rid of it.

Your tastes change over time too. Maybe you bought some sock books at one point, but realize after knitting some that you actually hate making socks. No reason to keep them. Getting rid of duplicates is a no-brainer too. When you’re done going through your stacks, consider getting rid of your give-away pile the same way you got rid of some of your yarn. Books and patterns are great additions to a yarn swap.

Fine Tune Your Sort

Go through your keepers and start sorting them like you would want to store them. Group your magazines by publisher and sort them by date. Magazines are floppy, so I like to store them in magazine files since they don’t take up much space on a shelf. A magazine binder also works great. I find pattern books kind of floppy too and tend to get lost on a shelf, especially the kind with stapled spines. So I like to keep these in magazine files too.

For books, I sort them by craft, and then sort them further by how to, stitch dictionaries, and pattern collections. Most books fall into one of these three categories. Others may prefer to sort by author name or book title. When I’m looking for a book, usually I’m looking for a type of book such as baby garments. Pick the sorting method that works for you.

Flag Your Favorites

Now comes the time consuming part. If you have trouble finding the patterns in your collection that you’re looking for, you might want to add this extra step. As you’re doing your fine sort, flip through the pages and mark your favorite patterns with a sticky note or tape flag. Sticky notes can be particularly nice since you can jot down the name or type of pattern on the edge of the note and have that portion stick out from the edge of the book. On Sunday, we’ll be covering more tips on how to track your pattern collection so you can find what you want.

Hope you have fun with this task. When I go through my pattern books and magazines, I always rediscover something I forgot about and get inspired all over again.

What is your favorite tip that helps you find the pattern you want from your pattern books and magazines?

– Dena

Ready, Set, Knit! 293: Kathy talks with WEBS Assistant Store Manager, Leslie Ann

Saturday, December 22nd, 2012
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Guest: 
Kathy and Leslie Ann talk about some great last minute gift ideas. Bulky yarns will work up quickly for a few more handmade gifts.

Greta’s hat in Fibre Company Tundra - or try a simple ribbed hat in Cascade Magnum or a cute earflap hat crocheted in Berroco Souffle

Leslie Ann and Kathy also discuss great little gifts to put together; washcloths in soft cottons with fancy soaps, potholders with cookbooks, or coasters with some special mugs. Don’t forget sheep themed, little, stocking stuffers!

And for the weaver you can’t go wrong with a new shuttle or a beautiful and unique shawl pin.

For more ideas check out our videos: Holiday Gift Ideas for Knitters and Crocheters and Holiday Gift Ideas for Weavers

WEBS Annual Year End Blowout Sale is happening online now through January 1st and  In-Store December 26th – 31st.

Steve’s Year End Blowout Sale Yarn Picks

There will be special In-Store Specials not available online, like a massive $2.00 Bin sale and a large pattern purge, look for discontinued patterns at great prices with the green dots.

Reminder:

WEBS is open tomorrow,  Sunday, 12/23, from 12 to 5PM EST for your holiday shopping convenience.

WEBS will be closing early, at 4:00PM, on 12/24 and will be closed Tuesday, 12/25

Upcoming Events:

Classic Elite Yarns Shawls, Wraps and Scarves book launch on January 24th, register now.

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Valley Yarns in Interweave Crochet Accessories!

Sunday, December 2nd, 2012
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We’re very happy to share the 2012 Accessories issue of Interweave Crochet. One of our Valley Yarns was used in the cover design!

You can see all of the projects from this issue at Crochetme.com

Karen Ratto-Whooley designed a two-color, self-fringeing scarf worked in back loop single crochet using our Valley Yarns Deerfield. The Elvis 1973 Scarf has the appearance of traditional Fair Isle knitting.

If you’re still looking for some great last minute gifts to make this issue is packed with wonderful cowls, scarves, hats and more.

Are you working on any of the projects from this issue?