Posts Tagged ‘knitting tips’

On the bookshelf this week: Vintage Design Workshop

Friday, November 1st, 2013
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NaKniSweMo – National Knit a Sweater Month is in full swing and it’s not too late to get started.

Geraldine Warner has put together a wonderful book that allows you to adapt vintage patterns into the perfect fit for modern-day style!

Vintage Design Workshop is divided into two sections, the first half teaches you how to update any vintage pattern to accommodate modern sizes and gives advice on choosing substitutes for yarns that are out of production. The second section demonstrates how to adapt modern patterns to create a vintage silhouette, teaching how to mix and match sleeves, necklines, or collars to the pattern of your choice to achieve a vintage look.

Leave a comment below and tell us if you’ve held onto a vintage pattern that you’d like to update and you could win a copy! All comments must be posted by 11:59pm EST on Tuesday, Nov. 5. Please make sure to leave us a way to contact you if you win! The winner will be drawn randomly and posted here the following day.

Edited, Wednesday November 6, 2013:

And our Winner is –  Michelle who said, “I’ve updated an already “updated” pattern from the 30′s with good results, but I’d love to have even more ideas. This book looks great.”

Congratulations Michelle! Keep an eye on your inbox, we’ll be contacting you soon.

Tuesday’s Tip – How to Block Colorwork or Lace Mittens

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013
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This week’s tip comes from Sara Delaney, designer of the Valley Yarns Safe Passage Hat and Mittens and Valley Yarns Frost Rime Cowl and Mitts.

When blocking mittens or fingerless mitts with color-work or lace, the stitches may need to be stretched a bit during blocking to settle into shape. Instead of just soaking your project and laying it flat to dry, you can use blocking wires (or long single point needles in a pinch!) to pull the edges evenly. This lets you block the mittens with minimal pin use and virtually no distortion to the pattern!

How to Block Colorwork or Lace Mittens

All proceeds from the sale of the Safe Passage Hat and Mittens benefit Safe Passage.

Tuesday’s Knitting Tip – Wrap and Turn

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013
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If you’re looking for a great handmade gift to give this holiday season, try socks! Socks can be quick and easy while still making a big impact. If you’re new to the world of knitting socks, tackling the heel may be the most intimidating part. Once you master the wrap and turn technique, they’re a cinch! You can see the wrap and turn demonstrated below, and you’ll be on your way to making socks in no time.

Valley Yarns B-3 Basic Socks are a great pattern to get started with if you’re never tried knitting socks before.

On the bookshelf this week: The Art of Seamless Knitting

Friday, October 18th, 2013
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Did you know that November is NaKniSweMo – National Knit a Sweater Month? That means it’s the perfect time to give away a copy of The Art of Seamless Knitting by Simona Merchant-Dest and Faina Goberstein

This book walks you through the ins and outs of seamless knitting with chapters on lace, cables and textured stitches as well patterns worked with top-down and bottom-up construction. You’ll find pullover and cardigan sweaters as well as accessories and loads of tips and tricks for increasing and decreasing in pattern.

Leave a comment below and tell us why you’d love to make a seamless sweater and you could win a copy! All comments must be posted by 11:59pm EST on Tuesday, Oct. 22. Please make sure to leave us a way to contact you if you win! The winner will be drawn randomly and posted here the following day.

Edited, Wednesday October 23, 2013:

And our Winner is –  Carmen who said, “I would love to make a seamless sweater. I have yet to finish a sweater for myself because I’m too worried about how I’m going to put it all together!”

Congratulations Carmen! Keep an eye on your inbox, we’ll be contacting you soon.

Tuesday’s Knitting Tip – How to Select the Right Length Circular Needle

Tuesday, October 15th, 2013
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This week’s tip comes from WEBS Design Manager, Kirsten. She helps us solve the mystery of what length circular needle to use for our projects.How to Select the Right Length Circular Needle

Finding the right length of circular needles can be confusing to even experienced knitters. As a general rule, the length of the needles should be shorter than the circumference of your knitting. You can always scrunch the stitches up on a short needle, but you can’t stretch them out. For example, if you’re knitting a 38″ sweater, you would use 32″ circular needle. Any longer and the stitches won’t reach all the way around, and any shorter wouldn’t leave enough room for the stitches on the needle. Of course, there’s an exception to this rule. You can use a needle longer than the length of your stitches if you’re doing magic loop. With the magic loop technique, you could actually work a hat on 40″ needles.

 

The Harlot is Coming!

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013
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My first career was in publishing–I did publicity for authors and books, and I worked in New York City, for a fairly well-known set of publishing houses (Random House and Simon & Schuster). My strength was celebrity authors, and I got to work with lots of them. When I moved to western Massachusetts, I worked at a smaller publisher, Storey Publishing, in the Berkshires, and I got to work with another celebrity: Stephanie Pearl-McPhee. Believe me, I was more excited to work with the Yarn Harlot than almost any other so-called “celebrity.” She’s a beautiful writer, she’s a lovely person, and most importantly, she is totally relatable to her audience and she’s an AMAZING knitter and teacher.

The Yarn Harlot is coming!

The Yarn Harlot is coming!

I’m super-duper excited that Stephanie is coming to WEBS right before Rhinebeck to teach for us!! She will run two classes, Grok the Sock (Thursday, October 17) and Knit Smart (Friday, October 18). Grok the Sock is a 6-hour sock intensive, not difficult, and integral to understanding basic construction of the sock.  Knit Smart is a lecture-style class with Stephanie’s trademark humor and smarts, about how to figure out where you might encounter knitting pitfalls and how to make ensure they don’t derail you.

There is limited space available in these classes, so sign up now and beat the Rhinebeck rush!

Tuesday’s Knitting Tip – How to Kitchener Stitch

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013
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The Kitchener stitch is essential to knitting socks from the top down, and even opens the door to symmetrical shawls and wraps. This technique takes live stitches, and grafts them together in a way that mimics the what a real knit stitch looks like. A properly executed Kitchener stitch looks like it’s not even there! You can see the Kitchener stitch in action below!

Tuesday’s Tip – How to Get the Best Fit for Hand Knit Gloves and Mittens

Tuesday, September 24th, 2013
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How to Measure for Gloves and MittensThis week’s tip comes from our Design Manager, Kirsten. She helps us understand how to get the best fit for our hand knit gloves and mittens

To choose the best size glove to make, you should measure around your hand above the knuckles, including the tip of the thumb, and pick the size that’s closest to this measurement. This will give you just the right amount of wiggle room and help account for the thickness of the fabric. I avoided sizing like that for the longest time, thinking I wanted really snug gloves and mittens, but they never felt quite right until I added the thumb tip.

 

 

Tuesday’s Knitting Tip – Make 1 Left and Right Increases

Tuesday, September 17th, 2013
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There are several different ways to increase in your knitting, but the make 1 increase (abbreviated m1L or m1R) is by far my favorite. The increase is subtle, and the option to have it lean to the left or right helps it blend into your project even better. You can see a demonstration of the technique in the video below.

Make 1 Left:
· Insert left needle from front to back under strand of yarn which runs between next stitch on left needle and last stitch on right needle
· Knit this stitch through back loop

Make 1 Right:
· Insert left needle from back to front under strand of yarn which runs between next stitch on left needle and last stitch on right needle
· Knit this stitch through front loop

Make 1 Purl Left:
· Insert left needle from back to front under strand of yarn which runs between next stitch on left needle and last stitch on right needle
· Purl this stitch through front loop

Make 1 Purl Right:
· Insert left needle from front to back under strand of yarn which runs between next stitch on left needle and last stitch on right needle
· Purl this stitch through back loop

Tuesday’s Tip – How to Fix a Stretched Collar

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013
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The neckline of a sweater can definitely stretch over time, and completely change the look of your garment.

If you have a sweater with a stretched collar, try single crocheting around the top of the ribbing. If you know how to crochet, this is the easiest and fastest method. But if you’re more comfortable knitting, you can also pick up and knit a couple of rows from the top. The new knitting (and the new bind-off) will be a little bit more snug and will help draw the neckline closed again.