Posts Tagged ‘knitting tips’

The Harlot is Coming!

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013
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My first career was in publishing–I did publicity for authors and books, and I worked in New York City, for a fairly well-known set of publishing houses (Random House and Simon & Schuster). My strength was celebrity authors, and I got to work with lots of them. When I moved to western Massachusetts, I worked at a smaller publisher, Storey Publishing, in the Berkshires, and I got to work with another celebrity: Stephanie Pearl-McPhee. Believe me, I was more excited to work with the Yarn Harlot than almost any other so-called “celebrity.” She’s a beautiful writer, she’s a lovely person, and most importantly, she is totally relatable to her audience and she’s an AMAZING knitter and teacher.

The Yarn Harlot is coming!

The Yarn Harlot is coming!

I’m super-duper excited that Stephanie is coming to WEBS right before Rhinebeck to teach for us!! She will run two classes, Grok the Sock (Thursday, October 17) and Knit Smart (Friday, October 18). Grok the Sock is a 6-hour sock intensive, not difficult, and integral to understanding basic construction of the sock.  Knit Smart is a lecture-style class with Stephanie’s trademark humor and smarts, about how to figure out where you might encounter knitting pitfalls and how to make ensure they don’t derail you.

There is limited space available in these classes, so sign up now and beat the Rhinebeck rush!

Tuesday’s Knitting Tip – How to Kitchener Stitch

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013
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The Kitchener stitch is essential to knitting socks from the top down, and even opens the door to symmetrical shawls and wraps. This technique takes live stitches, and grafts them together in a way that mimics the what a real knit stitch looks like. A properly executed Kitchener stitch looks like it’s not even there! You can see the Kitchener stitch in action below!

Tuesday’s Tip – How to Get the Best Fit for Hand Knit Gloves and Mittens

Tuesday, September 24th, 2013
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How to Measure for Gloves and MittensThis week’s tip comes from our Design Manager, Kirsten. She helps us understand how to get the best fit for our hand knit gloves and mittens

To choose the best size glove to make, you should measure around your hand above the knuckles, including the tip of the thumb, and pick the size that’s closest to this measurement. This will give you just the right amount of wiggle room and help account for the thickness of the fabric. I avoided sizing like that for the longest time, thinking I wanted really snug gloves and mittens, but they never felt quite right until I added the thumb tip.

 

 

Tuesday’s Knitting Tip – Make 1 Left and Right Increases

Tuesday, September 17th, 2013
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There are several different ways to increase in your knitting, but the make 1 increase (abbreviated m1L or m1R) is by far my favorite. The increase is subtle, and the option to have it lean to the left or right helps it blend into your project even better. You can see a demonstration of the technique in the video below.

Make 1 Left:
· Insert left needle from front to back under strand of yarn which runs between next stitch on left needle and last stitch on right needle
· Knit this stitch through back loop

Make 1 Right:
· Insert left needle from back to front under strand of yarn which runs between next stitch on left needle and last stitch on right needle
· Knit this stitch through front loop

Make 1 Purl Left:
· Insert left needle from back to front under strand of yarn which runs between next stitch on left needle and last stitch on right needle
· Purl this stitch through front loop

Make 1 Purl Right:
· Insert left needle from front to back under strand of yarn which runs between next stitch on left needle and last stitch on right needle
· Purl this stitch through back loop

Tuesday’s Tip – How to Fix a Stretched Collar

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013
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The neckline of a sweater can definitely stretch over time, and completely change the look of your garment.

If you have a sweater with a stretched collar, try single crocheting around the top of the ribbing. If you know how to crochet, this is the easiest and fastest method. But if you’re more comfortable knitting, you can also pick up and knit a couple of rows from the top. The new knitting (and the new bind-off) will be a little bit more snug and will help draw the neckline closed again.

Tuesday’s Tip – Use a Bread Clip to Tame Yarn Tails

Tuesday, August 27th, 2013
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This week’s tip comes from Kerry, one of our fantastic Customer Service Representatives here at WEBS.

Kerry discovered this tip when a customer sent in a partially completed project for us to look at. The customer needed help matching the discontinued yarn the project was made of, but Kerry couldn’t help notice the bread clip used to keep her yarn tail manageable and tidy. She had left an extra long yarn tail to use for seaming when her project was complete.

You could also use bread clips to substitute for bobbins when doing colorwork projects!

Tuesday’s Knitting Tip – Joining a 3-Needle Bind Off

Tuesday, August 20th, 2013
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This week, our Design Manager, Kirsten, shows us how to join a 3-needle bind off. This is such a wonderful technique for joining a vertical piece of knitting to a horizontal piece; such as the sleeves to the body of a sweater, or the edging of a shawl. The alternative to the 3-needle bind off is more cumbersome and involves binding off using the traditional yarn over method, then sewing the pieces together. This technique tends to be very tight and can cause the project to pucker. The 3-needle bind off keeps your project looking seamless!

Now that you’re familiar with the technique, you can cast on for the Multi-Directional Cowl, the Rhea Lace Stole, or the Rhea Lace Scarf!

Tuesday’s Tip – Keep the Yarn Label for Reference

Tuesday, August 13th, 2013
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When I finally complete a project after months of knitting or crocheting, the first thing I usually do is cast on for something new! And let’s face it, we don’t always wait until we finish knitting to get a new project going.

With so many projects going on at once, it’s easy to lose track of which yarn went with which finished object. Try keeping one of the ball bands used for your project, along with a scrap of the yarn. You can write on the back of the label which pattern was used with the yarn and which size you made. The label has valuable information like the care instructions for your project, as well as the dye-lot used. A photo album with pockets is great for storing the labels along with your scrap of yarn!

 

Tuesday’s Tip – Unravel Projects with a Ball Winder

Tuesday, August 6th, 2013
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Your ball winder is a valuable tool that can be utilized even after you start your project!

Sometimes you need to rip back the sleeves on a sweater, or just an entire project that didn’t come out quite right. So many of us end up winding the yarn from our project by hand. Don’t forget about your ball winder, and you can unravel your project in a snap!

For instruction on how to use a ball winder and swift, click here.

Ready, Set, Knit! 321: Kathy talks with Andi Smith

Saturday, August 3rd, 2013
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Guest: Kathy talks with first-time guest Andi Smith, designer and author of  Big Foot Knits. Originally from Yorkshire England, Andi has been knitting and crocheting for as long as she can remember. 10 years ago she met Shannon Oakey of Cooperative Press and on a drive back from Rhinebeck they talked about socks,how they didn’t fit, what Andi had been doing to alter sock patterns so they would fit and the book idea was born.

The first section of the book is all about helping you to make socks that really fit you. There is some math involved with figuring out your specific measurements and your gauge but then you are ready to make all kinds of socks that fit you well!

Copies of the book are available through Cooperative Press and Ravelry. Comment on this post and tell us why you need Big Foot Knits to win your own copy! Comments must be posted by 11:59pm EDT on Monday, August 5, 2013. 2 Winners will be chosen and will be announced on the show next week. Please make sure to include your e-mail address in the comments so we can contact you if you’re one of our winners!

Steve’s Yarn Picks

August Sale Yarn Highlights – our End of Summer Sale runs through August 31st

Upcoming Events:

Stitches Midwest is happening NEXT weekend! August 8-11 at the Renaissance Schaumburg Hotel & Convention Center in Schaumburg, IL.

We will have yarn and hat samples from Schachenmayr yarn’s new My Mountain collection at our booth. We will also be partnering with Dream in Color yarns to offer a shawl kit to benefit Chelsea’s Light. Check out the recent podcast from Ben Levisay, The Fiber Hooligan for more details.

Registration has opened for our 7th Annual Bus Trip to the NY Sheep & Wool Festival in Rhinebeck!

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