Posts Tagged ‘knitting tools’

More Employee Wishlists

Monday, December 9th, 2013
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We’ve asked a few more of our employees what’s on their personal wishlists. After all, if it’s on the wishlist of a WEBS employee you know it’s a good choice for the fiber enthusiast in your life!

amys wishlistHi, I’m Amy S. and I’m a knitter and weaver.  Amy is our Mutimedia Assistant and a Sales Associate in our Retail Store.

My holiday wish list includes:

1  Harrisville Designs Cone Holder - My cones are rolling everywhere when I’m winding a warp.  This would make it much easier for me to start my weaving projects!

2  Knitter’s Pride Karbonz 6” Double Pointed Needle Set -  I really feel like I should never need to buy any more needles, but I can never seem to find my smaller DPN’s.  I love the way the Karbonz feel.  It would make it so much easier just to have the whole set.  Don’t you think?

3 The Original Thera Glove -After hours of knitting my hand can get sore.  This just might be a way to get a couple more hours in.  I’ve heard great reviews from customers who use it.

4 Knitter’s Pride Needle Gauge –  They aren’t expensive but I’m going to need about 10, one for every project bag.  As far as I’m concerned you can’t have enough of these.  It’s a great stocking stuffer too.

5 Large Blocking Board – I can’t believe I don’t own one of these yet!
Hi, I’m Ping and I’m a knitter. Ping is a Sales Associate in our store and a Valley Yarns designer.

My holiday wish list includes:

1  Reisenthal Allrounder Medium Bag - You know that boy scout saying “be prepared”, the same applies for knitters. Since I am constantly driving my kids to various appointments and activities, there is always a project bag ready and waiting for me. I love the Reisenthal Allrounder Medium bag. Size of the bag can accommodate a variety of projects, from shawl to color work sweater project – it fits. The hinged satchel is reminiscent of a doctor’s bag; no fumbling around something. With plenty of roomy interior pockets, tools, keys and even your phone have a place.

2  Run, Run, Run Lunch Tote - Okay, I believe you can NEVER have too many bags.  This one is stylish and oh so practical. What is not to love? It folds down to nothing so it’s a great emergency bag. It’s reflective, insulated interior lets you see inside your bag with ease. The finish is smooth, so it’s easy to clean. Plus, the interior is made from recycled water bottles. It comes in four cute colors; each has a little message. My heart is set orange bag. I love how it reminds me to keep taking chances.

3  Lantern Moon Stitch markers -  These stitch marketers are the embodiment of cute! WEBS carries a wonderful assortment of these charming and whimsical stitch markers. Whether it’s the tiny crocheted blue birds, bees, sheep or flowers, there are six in a package. They are lightweight and won’t weigh down your knitting. Each crocheted image is mounted on a metallic marker ring that ensures snag free knitting. My daughters have threatened to use my Lantern Moon stitch markers as earring charms, so I really need to stock up!

4  Knitter’s Pride Karbonz Interchangeable Deluxe Set - When someone asks me why I have a need for so many different types knitting needles, I tell them that knitting needles are tools, and like any tool, a crafter does not have just one. Have you ever asked a woodworker how many drills, hammers, screw drivers, or chisels  he or she has? Or how many knives and pans does the serious home chef own? Does a painter only paint with one brush? Enough said. The yarn and the project often dictate the best knitting needle to help you accomplish your creative endeavor.  As I age, I find my hands are more sensitive surfaces and weight of my tools. I want warmth and flexibility without comprising speed and sight. This is why I find the Knitter’s Pride Karbonz needles so appealing. The carbon fiber is warm, flexible and lightweight. The metallic tip allows me to see the stitches even in indoor evening light. More importantly, unlike most  interchangeable sets, the Karbonz interchangeable deluxe set includes sizes 2.5 and 3 – perfect of lace and sock knitting. Most interchangeable sets stop at size 4. These needles would be a perfect complement to my needle toolbox.

5  Warping Board - In 2013, I learned dress and use a 4-harness loom. This was an amazing learning experience. My education as a weaver has only just begun. The tool that fascinates me the most is the warping board. Made from hardwoods, the simple rectangular frame and strategically position pegs appears rather unassuming, but this ingenious tool enables you to consistently measure your warp ends. For example, the Schacht 14 yard warping board is only 36 inches across. The methodical manner of winding the yarn under, over and around the different pegs is quite calming and rather meditative.

6 WEBS classes -  I believe the opportunity to create with one’s hands something beautiful and entirely personal is truly part of the human condition. There are so many wonderful classes offered at WEBS; knitting, crocheting, weaving, spinning, dyeing, felting - all my favorite tactile sports! The classes satisfy my curiosity and my need to create, to learn and to broaden my appreciation of the fiber arts.  There are just not enough hours in the day to pursue all the things I wish to make. However, when I take a class, it gives me the chance to learn and to create in a very focused manner.

 

Hi, I’m Amy G and I’m a Knitter. Amy is our Education Manager.

My holiday wishlist includes:

1 I would love a huge supply of  T-Pins because I always seem to have “just enough” and I’d love to not have to worry that I’ll run out.

2 I would love a sweater’s worth of Madeline Tosh Merino Light in Badlands, a dark, interesting color I fell in love with at Stitches West this year.

3 It would be great to have the Barbara Walker Treasury of Knitting Patterns, the 4th volume, which is the only one I don’t own.

4 Hey, how about a set of Karbonz double points in sizes 4, 5, and 6? Those are my most-used sizes and I love using dpns, especially these pointy-tipped beauties.

5 Mostly what I’d love is a comfy sofa, good light, hot coffee, “Breaking Bad” streaming on my iPad, and three days’ worth of knitting. And then a nap.

 

 

Hi, I’m Jamie and I’m a knitter! Jamie is our E-Mail Marketing Manager.

My holiday wishlist includes:

1 Knitter’s Pride Nova Special Interchangeable Circular Set — It seems like every time I find a new hat pattern to knit I end up needing one or two new 16″ circular needles. I love using the Novas that I already have – they’re nice and smooth and the tips are pointy, but not too pointy. With the Special Interchangeable Circular Set I’d never have to worry about not having the right needles for a hat pattern, and I could have two (or three, or four) on my needles at once!

2 Fibre Company Tundra — I cannot get enough of this yarn. Seriously, can I have all of it? It’s great for quick hats for gifts (I love Greta’s Tundra Hat pattern), and now that the Tundra Elements collection is out there are even more warm and soft projects to whip up!

3 Weekend Hats by Cecily Glowik MacDonald and Melissa LaBarre — I’ve been on a hat knitting kick lately, and I’d be really excited to get this book. The book’s presentation is lovely, and it features hat patterns from a who’s-who of knitwear designers!

4 Knitter’s Pride Lace Blocking Mats — I’ve grown tired of pinning my damp finished objects to the carpet. It seems kind of gross both for the projects and the carpet. The Lace Blocking Mats are a great solution —  they don’t take up too much space but can expand for larger pieces.

5 Lee Highlighter Tape — As I’ve done more lace patterns, I’ve found myself frequently wishing I had Highlighter Tape. My current system consists of resting my pencil next to the row I’m on. It’s not very good system, as the pencil frequently rolls down the page or gets knocked off-course by a curious dog.

Employee Wishlists

Monday, November 25th, 2013
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Every year we put together a few posts and  videos to help our customers find those extra and special little gifts for the fiber enthusiast in their life.  This year we thought we’d ask our employees what’s on their personal wishlists. After all, if it’s on the wishlist of a WEBS employee you know it’s a good choice!

Hi, I’m Katie and I’m a Knitter and Dyer. Katie is a Sales Associate in our retail store but has also worked in our Warehouse.
My holiday wishlist includes:
1. Namaste Oh Snap! Pouches -These bags are great because they won’t snag your yarn and you can see the project inside! This is a great product for and knitter or crocheter who has multiple projects going at the same time.

2. Jade Sapphire Brigadoon and Getting Purly with it Cowl pattern - I love this cowl pattern and the yarn; who doesn’t want washable cashmere?

3. Wild Color by Jenny Dean - A friend loaned me this book when I told her that I was interested in natural dyeing. It is filled with useful information for both the new and experienced dyer.

4. BFL Fingering, natural hanks - In the dye experiments I have done, this has been my favorite yarn with which to dye. It takes the color beautifully and is such a lovely wool to wear as well.

5. Lantern Moon embroidery scissors - I need some small, sharp scissors for my tool kit and these would make a great stocking stuffer! Plus, Lantern Moon uses sustainable practices in all areas of their business, so
you can feel good about supporting them!

Hi, I’m Greta and I’m a knitter and crocheter. Greta is one of our Website Coordinators but she has also worked in our retail store.
My holiday wishlist includes:
1. Sweet Georgia CashSilk Lace - because…Silk! Cashmere!

2. The Principles of Knitting by June Hemmons Hiatt - I don’t have it yet and not owning it makes me feel like an irresponsible knitter.

3. The Knitter’s Book of Finishing Techniques by Nancie M. Wiseman - My goal for 2014 is to FINISH some of my many, many works in progress.

4. A skein of Freia Lace in the Dusk colorway - I’m totally obsesses with Amy Stephen’s Rooshed pattern and I’m excited to see what it would look like in this beautiful ombre lace yarn.

5. Knitter’s Pride Bamboo Crochet Hook Set - I only just took up crochet this year, but I’m very excited about it! I would like a crochet hook set so I don’t have to worry whether I have a particular hook size or not!

 

 

Hi, I’m Ashley and I’m a dangerous fiber nerd. Ashley is a Sales Associate in our retail store and our resident spinning expert.
My holiday wishlist includes:
1.Abstract Fibers 40/40/20 - Raw Merino/Superwash Merino/Silk, hand dyed blended fibers

2. Ashland Bay Organic Polwarth wool fiber - Super soft, springy wool that takes dye beautifully and spins up smoothly. Processed ecologically

3. Dream in Color Classy with Cashmere - Having a love affair with this super soft yarn, which wants to become new garments for me to snuggle with, in hand dyed colors that pop!

4. Be Sweet Bamboo - Gorgeous hand dyed colors in cable-plied 100% bamboo, which I recently made my first pullover with, and the drape and softness of this yarn makes me want to knit another one right away.

5.  Zealana Willow DK - Following the thread of cashmere addiction running through my wishlist, this blend of 70% New Zealand Merino and a whopping 30% Cashmere content makes visions of cozy soft hats and snug wintertime socks dance in my head…

Hi, I’m J, aka Young Man, and I’m a knitter and weaver. J is a Sales Associate in our retail store.
My holiday wishlist includes:
1. Eucalan, lavender scent - To give with gifts, samples and full size bottles, please.

2. Fix-a-Stitch lace - My current method is Okay but this is perfect.

3. Knitter’s Pride Karbonz 6” DPN set - Love these DPNs; one word: smooth.

4. Schacht baby Wolf 26” – four now, four later - It’s a wishlist and this is definitely what I wish for.

5. Buffalo Wool Co. Sexy in the Royalty colorway - Bison down and silk, thank you very much.

Are 4 (or 5) Needles Better Than One?

Friday, August 16th, 2013
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Although my poor grandmother tried to teach me to knit when I was nine years old, I had absolutely no patience for fine motor skills at that point, and was much happier playing with her jewelry. I didn’t learn to knit until I was an adult, and I learned very traditionally: straight needles, follow a pattern, make a bottom-up sweater with set-in sleeves and a crew neck. When I started working at Webs shortly after I had gained some mastery of the craft, I was astounded at the variety of designs, techniques, and yarns I encountered. It was overwhelming, but I wanted to try it all. The one thing I stuck to was knitting any sort of tube with double-pointed needles. I honestly tried to use Magic Loop, two circulars, anything but DPNs. However, I don’t love knitting socks ( I have made exactly three socks) and I loved the way my DPNs made hats, baby booties, and sleeves on sweaters look. I’m always on the lookout for really great needles, and I think I have found my DPN mecca: Knitters Pride Karbonz. I recently knit baby sweaters for twins to be born in September, and the pattern was a beautifully easy top-down raglan with the sleeves picked up and knit on DPNs. I did one sweater with my old faithful Dreamz needles, but picked up a set of the Karbonz to try on sweater #2.

Reader, it was heaven.

All kinds’a'Karbonz at Webs!

The Karbonz shaft gripped the yarn just right–it slid easily but didn’t slide off. The tips are sharp and glide-y but they didn’t split the yarn, and there was no discernable bump or glitch at the place where the tip met the body of the needle. Best of all, they look super-badass. Shiny silver tip attached to a matte black needle made me feel a little naughty, even though the project they were attached to was the most adorable peach and lime green baby kimono. Karbonz are available in circulars as well, and we’ve just added interchangeable sets, too. They are well worth the slightly higher price point, and will last until your granddaughters refuse to learn to knit with them.

Yarn Cake

Friday, August 2nd, 2013
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In the retail store, customers sometimes look at our ball-winder-and-swift set-up and ask us if we can wind their skeined yarn for them. “No,” we say gently. “We can show you how to do and you can get right on it.” There’s usually a look of panic, or a plea (“just for me? I can’t possibly.”) but we’re firm–because the beauty of a ball winder and a swift is that you can wind up any skein of yarn with less than three minutes of instruction, and it will usually take about 17 seconds for a long, twisty skein to turn into a firm, compact yarn cake. In my first years of knitting, I used to make my husband hold his arms out like a robot to wind a skein into a ball, and when he wasn’t around, I’d have my kids do it. However, it didn’t take long for them to become bored and annoyed at the constant demands on their time (very important things to do! Pokemon cards to look at! Legos to leave on the floor so that I step on them, barefoot, and cry!), and I’d start bribing them with candy, and then with cold, hard cash.

A tasty skein of Northampton Sport, wound into a cake!

A friend and co-worker convinced me to invest in a ball-winder and swift combo. I was really hesitant about doing this, because for some reason I thought that once I had the tools, I was expected to be a SERIOUS KNITTER. But the first time I hooked a skein onto that plastic swift and twirled the handle of the ball winder around for less than a minute, I was hooked. It was amazingly simple and the results are instantaneous. Ball winders, by the way, have a hilarious instruction manual in the packaging that is translated from Japanese and makes it all worthwhile. I have the plastic and metal swift, but we also sell a beautiful wooden swift that is much larger, and will probably be around when you teach your granddaughter or grandson how to knit. Spinners, weavers, dyers, and knitters can all benefit from a little fiber help, and these two indispensable tools will make your life a billion times easier.You can use either of these products separately–swifts can be used to wind spun fiber, and ball winders are great for coned yarns. Webs offers a fantastic deal on the two if bought together.

Now you can eat the M&Ms by yourself without having to parcel them out to the child who complains about how itchy the baby alpaca feels.

Blocked!

Friday, July 19th, 2013
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I know there are many of you out there who block their FO’s on the living room carpet, an unused couch, your guest bed’s mattress, or (I don’t want to know) not at all. I also know that many of you come through the fire with garments that are curly, ravelly, mis-sized or misshapen, or crooked. Your lace is delicate and airy when blocked, scrunchy and meh-looking when unblocked. Your sweaters are rolling at the edges, with one sleeve longer than the other and too tight in the hips until you loosen up the fibers with a cool bath and some Eucalan.

I used to do all of that, too. My garments looked so much better once I invested in a blocking board, which has changed my knitting. Really. It has clearly marked measuring squares for perfect symmetry for sleeves or waist shaping. It is big, so you could potentially block a scarf or medium-ish-sized shawl on it. It is padded, so pins really dig in and don’t move or pop out. It has a felt backing, so it won’t slide around on whatever surface you use. The most genius part: It folds in half and has a convenient handle so you can tote it to the craft room, the den, the deck, or to your drop-in class at Webs to show off your fibery skills.

This could be your sweater!

We carry these boards in two sizes, the small, which measures 18″ x 24″ and is more portable, and the larger size, measuring 33″ x 51″. I really recommend the larger one, since you’ll be able to use it for so many different projects, and you won’t regret the investment. For most garments, a dunk in some cool water to which a capful of wool wash has been added is the way to start. Don’t swirl it around, and for heaven’s sake, don’t squish it dry–if it’s anything but cotton or superwash wool, it will felt. I drain my wet garments in a colander for an hour and then roll them in a towel to just damp. Then, pin away–these T-pins are the best I’ve found. Let it dry, and voila! Art has been made.

The Only Library You Can Carry in Your Knitting Bag

Friday, June 21st, 2013
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A knitting teacher in your pocket!

I’m more and more convinced that Knit-Kards™ are the most genius thing ever. Produced by Nancy’s Knit Knacks, which sounds very folksy, these 14 double-sided laminated cards (with handy keyhole and ring included!) contain every piece of information you need to make a sweater, a sock, or a blanket, along with tips and tricks to make that project hum. A long-tail cast-on can be a pain, because what happens when you don’t leave yourself enough yarn to complete the cast-on? You have to rip that sucker out and start over. Believe me, my kids have learned the most choice swears from lurking around my knitting chair. The Long Tail Cast-on Knit Kard™  provides a table with a simple formula to figure out the number of inches of yarn needed based on number of stitches cast on and needle size. Bingo! Job done.

Along with yardage requirements for any kind of garment, from sweaters (baby) to afghans (huge), Knit Kards™ instruct users through Kitchener Stitch, basic increases and decreases, and how to use those increases and decreases for optimum graceful shaping. Yarn Label Guides explain the care symbols used by clothing makers so that your treasured garment doesn’t end up fitting your American Girl Doll. You can convert ounces to grams, meters to yards, and vice versa, learn how to make the perfect gauge swatch, or learn what the abbreviation K1b means. And to top it all off, you get a knitting needle/crochet hook inventory card to keep track of those needles you keep in a plastic shopping bag (Hey! maybe we can talk knitting bags and storage solutions in a follow-up post!). The bright colors make them easy to find in your crowded project bag, and the index-card size makes them convenient to take anywhere.

All the WEBS sales team keep Knit Kards™ in our apron pockets, and we all use them religiously. You should too!

Ready, Set, Knit! 307: Kathy talks with Kim Cole

Saturday, April 13th, 2013
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Guest:
 Kathy talks with Kim Cole, creater of the Gleener, a fabric care wand that will help eliminate surface pills and fuzz from your hand knits and almost any other fabric.

After using most other de-pilling products on the market to try and save a favorite sweater, Kim was frustrated by their lack of effectiveness and began the process of developing a product that would work. It took over 7 years to bring the product to market but now the Gleener is available to help you care for all kinds of fabrics from natural fibers to synthetics.

Here Kendra shows you how easy the Gleener is to use on your handknits.

Steve’s Yarn Picks

New Yarns

39th Anniversary Sale Highlights
New Closeouts

This weekend, today and tomorrow, you can join us at  Stitches Southat the Renaissance Waverly Hotel & Cobb Galleria Centre in Atlanta, GA. We may have overpacked, come visit our booths and see what we have for you!

Upcoming Events: 

The full line-up of Summer classes will be online on Friday, April 19th and printed booklets will arrive shortly thereafter but we have some exciting classes with amazing guests teachers already up and ready for you to join!

Stephen West is making his first appearance at WEBS with 2 classes, Top-down Shawl Basics and Top-down Shawl Design Workshop, as well as an event open to the public on June 13th.

Jason Collingwood is making his only area appearance at WEBS, June 15-17 with his class on Plain Weave. Sign up now, there are only a few seats left!

Gale Zucker will be returning to us to teach the intricacies of taking the best photographs of your finished knits and so much more.

Amy Herzog will be joining us on June 6 to celebrate the release of her new book Knit to Flatter, register now to be part of this fun-filled evening.

Ann Budd will also be teaching at WEBS this summer with her Sweater Basics and Finishing class in July.

Don’t forget about the Tent Sale on May 18th and 19th!

And the Third Annual I-91 Shop Hop is happening June 27-30th.

Right click or CTRL+click and Save As to download the MP3 of this Podcast Subscribe to Ready, Set, Knit! in iTunes Subscribe to the Ready, Set, Knit! Podcast RSS Feed

 

Ready, Set, Knit! 306: Kathy talks with Donna Druchunas

Saturday, April 6th, 2013
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Guest:
 Kathy talks with Donna about her path into the knitting world, she began as a computer tech writer and at the prompting of a friend began to transfer to writing about something she loved – knitting! She now writes books and teaches as well as tech editing for independent designers and translating German knitting books into English. She has a new book in the works on knitting in Lithuania with history, culture and telling that culture’s story through knitting; similar to her book Arctic Lace.

  

Donna has also worked to develop 2 different apps for iPad and iPhone. First there was the Knit Companion app and her newest is Travel the World of Knitting with embedded stitch video tutorial and a collection of new patterns.

Steve’s Yarn Picks

39th Anniversary Sale Highlights

New Closeouts
Upcoming Events: 

Join us at  Stitches South! this week in the Renaissance Waverly Hotel & Cobb Galleria Centre April 11-14th in Atlanta, GA.

Don’t forget about the Tent Sale on May 18th and 19th!

The Third Annual I-91 Shop Hop is happening June 27-30th.

Right click or CTRL+click and Save As to download the MP3 of this Podcast Subscribe to Ready, Set, Knit! in iTunes Subscribe to the Ready, Set, Knit! Podcast RSS Feed

 

31 Days to Get Organized: Out and About with Your Knitting and Crochet

Tuesday, January 29th, 2013
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Knitting and crochet are fantastic hobbies for all the reasons we already know, but one of the best things about them is that they are super portable! A small project is the perfect thing to have with you to keep occupied while in line, waiting for the doctor, waiting for the kids to get out of practice, on a plane, in a car – anywhere.

How do you keep your project organized while you’re out? I’ve been known to just toss my project in whatever purse I’m using that day, but velcro and zippers can be dangerous to a project. The GoKnit Pouches are fantastic! They keep your project safe and have a handy strap that can be snapped around your wrist or belt loop. They protect your project from the other items in your bag, and keep your project and tools organized in one place, so you can grab and go.

The Chic.a Single Yarn Keeper is a portable way to tote and protect the yarn you’re working with. You don’t have to worry about it getting tangled in anything else in your bag since you just feed your yarn through the eyelet on the top and the yarn inside the pouch stays protected.

We have lots of other options for bags in tons of sizes and styles. There are bags like the Namaste Harlow that not only store your knitting, but everything else you need – wallet, keys, work, and more. We also have many project bags, like the Blue Sky Pretty Cheep Bag that is perfect for storing your project and stuffing it into a larger bag.

When I knit while I’m out and about, I always get asked “What are you making?” So far, no one has really looked at me funny for knitting in public, but maybe I haven’t picked anywhere all that unusual yet!

What’s the most unusual place you’ve ever knit or crocheted?

31 Days to Get Organized: Storing Your Knitting and Crochet Tools

Sunday, January 27th, 2013
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Now that we’ve collected all of our knitting and crochet tools, it’s time to put them away in a way that’s easy for us to find later. Many of you already have a way that you store your tools that’s working well for you. But if you’re still looking for a solution, here are some ideas how others store their knitting and crochet tools.

  • Put your most essential tools into small cases that you can easily fit in a project bag or carry with you. Last Friday, we showed several examples of knitting and crochet tool kits.
  • Create a few mini tool kits so you can keep one with each project you’re working on.
  • Store small items like darning needles and stitch markers in small containers like an Altoids tin, Lantern Moon Mort Ort Bin, or the Namaste Buddy Case.
  • Clear pouches or zipper cases are a favorite way to store tools since you can see what you have, making finding something easier. For an inexpensive version try pencil cases, or if you’re looking for something a little cuter, check out the Chic.a Clear Front Zipper Pouches available in small and large sizes, or the Namaste Oh Snap! Pouches.
  • If you like the idea of clear storage, but need something a little bigger with more compartments, the Knit Happy Fold ‘n Go Notions Box may be just right for all your tools and gadgets.

  • For the crafter who likes to be uber-organized, try looking at non-conventional storage solutions such as a hanging jewelry organizer with pockets, a fishing tackle bag, or a tool box. They have lots of compartments and ways to sort your tools.
  • If you have a drawer available for storage, use modular drawer trays to keep all of your gadgets sorted and easier to find.
  • Avoid deep boxes and storage where smaller items can sift to the bottom and get lost.
  • Do you find that you’re continually hunting for certain tools. Keep a decorative bowl or open container near where you knit or crochet as easily accessible storage for tools that you use frequently.
  • Also if find that you’re not very good at putting away your tools on a regular basis, consider keeping a bowl or open box near where you store your tools as a an intermediate place to collect them until you have time to put them away.

How do you like to store your knitting and crochet tools? I especially love to hear about your unconventional storage solutions.

- Dena