Posts Tagged ‘Kristin Nicholas’

Ready, Set, Knit! 337: Kathy talks with Kristin Nicholas

Saturday, December 14th, 2013
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This week Kathy talks with knitwear designer and colorwork guru Kristin Nicholas.

Kathy and Kirsten discuss lots of great last minute knit projects for gifts and decorating from Valley Yarns:

Last Minute Hat, Last Minute Mittens, Valley Knit Stars and Mini Mittens - all FREE knitting patterns.

And patterns from Kristin:

Quarters CapFarmgirls’ Stocking CapHeart to Heart MittensElves, Gnomes, Santa + Leo Tolstoy (FREE), Felted Pen + Pencil CoziesKnit it Felt it Zip it , the Colorful and Creative Christmas Stocking patterns as well as the Lamb Holiday Cards.

Steve’s Yarn Picks:

Upcoming Events:

Shipping Deadlines are quickly approaching – WEST COAST, non expedited orders deadline was yesterday, 12/13/2013.

WEBS will be open on Sundays, from 12-5,  through December 22nd.

Reminder:

We’re collecting Hats for Halos of Hope. Our thanks to everyone that has already sent in hats, keep ‘em coming!

Make as many knit and/or crochet hats as you can (check here for preferred fibers and free patterns) and get them to us by February 1, 2014. Make sure each hat and package is labeled with “Team RSK!” Please mail all packages to:

WEBS
Attn: TEAM RSK!
6 Industrial Pkwy.
Easthampton, MA 01027

If you’re posting about your progress on Facebook or Twitter please use #PodcastThrowdown. And please join the Podcasters Throwdown Group on Ravelry and show your support in the Team RSK thread! If you’ve sent in hats let us know who you are.

Right click or CTRL+click and Save As to download the MP3 of this Podcast Subscribe to Ready, Set, Knit! in iTunes Subscribe to the Ready, Set, Knit! Podcast RSS Feed

Sebastian Gloves Knitalong – Week 3

Sunday, November 25th, 2012
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We’re wrapping up the Classic Elite Yarns Sebastian Gloves Knitalong this week. How are your gloves coming along? I’ve finally finished one of the ribbed cuff gloves and I’ve started a cable cuff glove too.

Cable Cuff Clarification – First up, if you’re knitting the Cable Cuff version of the gloves and haven’t started knitting from the second chart yet, there was a missing line in the instructions. After you finished knitting the 16 rows of the Cuff Cable Chart, BEGIN FOLLOWING CABLE CHART OVER 18 STS BEGINNING WITH ROUNDS 4 TO 8, THEN WORKING CHART RNDS 1 TO 8 TO COMPLETE GLOVE. Some of you may have picked up on this omission. But some may have started with round 1 of the second chart. But no worries. Your gloves will still look great. You’ll just have an extra twist in your second middle cable crossing. You can see an example of the extra twist here.

Change to Smaller Needles for Fingers – After you’ve knit the last Reverse Stockinette Ridge and placed the stitches on waste yarn, be sure to change to your smaller needles. I missed this step in the directions, but it’s not the end of the world. By knitting the fingers on smaller needles, this will create a more dense and durable knitted fabric. This is exactly what you want on the finger tips which is where my gloves wear out first. I’ve mended the fingertips of these gloves so many times. I love them and will keep mending them until I run out of yarn. So keep your yarn scraps from the gloves for future mending.

Use Short DPNs – If you never knit glove fingers before on double pointed needles, you may find a shorter needle such as the Knitter’s Pride Dreamz 5″ DPNs to be easier to work with. You’ll only have 3-5 stitches on each needle, and longer DPNs may feel more awkward and just get in the way.

Shaping Finger Tops – Once you’ve knit to the top of a finger and after threading the tail through the remaining stitches, I like to tighten up the stitches from my last round before pulling the tail tightly to close up the top. I find this creates a more tidy looking finger tip.

Closing Up the Gaps – Once you’ve finished all of the fingers, you may find some gaps between each finger. Since you left nice, long tails at the beginning of each finger, with just a couple of stitches, you’ll be able to easily close up those gaps. Before weaving in your ends and cutting off the extra yarn, try on your gloves looking for any other gaps that you want to close up.

Embellish Those Gloves – I really like the look of the cable pattern without any embroidery. But I’ve seen others do some really nice embellishing too. Have fun with this part; you’re almost done!

Thanks again to everyone who have been sharing their glove progress with us. It’s great to see so many knitting along. Feel free to leave any questions in the comments below. And if you’re on Ravelry, we’d love to see a picture of your finished gloves in the Sebastian Gloves thread.

Happy Knitting!

- Dena

Sebastian Gloves Knitalong – Week 2

Sunday, November 18th, 2012
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So is everyone ready to get started knitting their Sebastian Gloves? I’ve been working on the Ribbed Cuff Version and have really been enjoying having a portable knitting project again.

First off, I’d like to answer a couple of questions people have had on social media this past week. Some of you may be having the same questions.

1. “I’m not very good at knitting on double pointed needles. Would it be possible to magic loop these?” Absolutely! I would suggest knitting the gloves using your favorite small-diameter circular knitting method. I started out knitting my glove on DPNs, but once I got to the cable portion, I found it easier to knit on two circular needles. With this cable pattern, I didn’t like having a cable cross between two double pointed needles. With two circulars or the magic loop method, it’s easy to have each cable portion on a separate needle.

2. “I don’t want the cable pattern on the inside of the glove. If I recall, cable draws the fabric in compared to the same number of stitches in stockinette. If that’s true – is there a way to figure out how much I’d need to reduce the number of stitches on the inside without knitting it, measuring it, and pulling it out?” Kristin Nicholas‘s response to this question: You would have to figure out your stockinette gauge and substitute in. You would also have to adjust the finger stitch numbers for pickup. The reason I put the cable on both sides is because if a glove is the same on the front and back it can be worn on both hands. The gloves I have that are either right or left handed always wear out on the right hand first. You can swap the gloves between hands so they will wear evenly and you won’t have to re-knit the fingers so often.

3. “Is there a fingerless version of these?” or “Wonder if I could make these as mittens instead of gloves?” If you want to make a fingerless version, there has been suggestions to bind off after the last reverse stockinette ridge or to stop knitting the fingers at the first knuckle. If you want to make mittens, I would suggest skipping the last reverse stockinette ridge and continuing the cable pattern. Follow a basic mitten pattern to shape the top. But you’ll have to do some extra work figuring out how to end the cable pattern.

Now let’s get knitting! Below, you’ll find some notes, links to video tutorials, and tips as you knit the gloves.

Cast On – I just used my go-to Long Tail Cast On. Unless I need a really stretchy cast-on edge, I use this most of the time.

Needles – If you’ve never used DPNs before or need some tips, check out our Knitting in the Round on DPNs video.

Changing Colors – If you’ve never changed colors in your knitting, check out our video on How to Add a New Color to Your Knitting.

Ribbed Cuff – For the first row of ribbing in the ribbed cuff, I would suggest knitting all stitches. If you do the ribbed pattern on the first row, you’ll get a messier transition between the color change (see photo at the right). I ripped back and reknit this row. Check out our tutorial on how to knit clean stripes in ribbing for more explanation.

Knitting Cables – I love cables because they add a lot of fun texture and look a lot more complicated than they really are. If you’re a cable newbie, watch our How to Knit Cables video before starting the cable section. One of my favorite tools to use to keep track of where I’m at in a cable chart is highlighter tape. Really, it’s awesome. You can see it in use here. But sticky notes work really well too.

Marking the Thumb Gusset – Later in the glove, you’ll need to measure from the beginning of the thumb gusset, to where you knit the last reverse stockinette ridge. For ease of measuring later, I would suggest slipping a locking stitch marker in the middle of the cable pattern of this row. It’s easier to see where the thumb gusset begins.

Knitting the Thumb Gusset – You’ll be using a Make 1 stitch (M1) to create the thumb gusset. For a refresher on how to knit Make 1 Increases, watch this video.

Once you’ve knit the thumb gusset, you’ll hold the thumb stitches on waste yarn and continue knitting the rest of the glove hand. You’ll need to knit until the hand measures a certain amount from the beginning of the thumb. Don’t make the mistake that I made and measure from where you put the thumb stitches on waste yarn. You’ll need to measure from the beginning of the thumb gusset. So I had several rows I had to unknit. And unknitting cables is definitely harding then knitting them. Learn from my mistakes.

That brings us to the last reverse stockinette ridge. We’ll pick up there next week. Now take a moment, slip on your glove, and take a picture. Looking good so far I bet. Share your progress on our Ravelry page here. I’d love to see everyone’s color choices and gloves so far. I’m knitting the small size, which is a little snug for my hand.

If you get stuck, please post your questions in the comments.

Happy Knitting!

- Dena

 

Sebastian Gloves Knitalong – Week 1

Sunday, November 11th, 2012
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We loved Kristin Nicholas’s Sebastian Gloves the first time we saw them. But we were blown away by the incredible response they got when we featured them on the cover of our Fall 2012 Catalog. Their cheerful cuteness were hard to resist.

Last week, Kristin Nicholas kicked off a two-day Sebastian Gloves knitting class. But not everyone is fortunate enough to live close enough to WEBS to take our classes. So we’re starting a knitalong today for the Sebastian Gloves! If you’ve never heard of a knitalong (also known as KAL) or participated in one before, they’re a fun way for a group of knitters to virtually knit a pattern together. We’ll offer tips, answer your questions, provide tutorials on techniques used in the gloves. You’ll share your progress, ask questions when you get stuck, and definitely post photos of your finished gloves.

If you’ve never knit gloves before, a knitalong is a great excuse to try a new kind of project. You’ll find lots of help and encouraging words here.

This week of the knitalong you’ll be collecting the supplies you’ll need to get started.

Step 1 – Purchase the pattern. You have two options. The Sebastian Gloves can be found in the Classic Elite Yarns 9209 Color by Kristin Book 1 pattern book which we currently have in stock. Or if you prefer a digital version, you can purchase the Sebastian Gloves PDF pattern on our website too.

Step 2 – Purchase the yarn. The yarn used for the gloves is Classic Elite Yarns Color by Kristin, a 50% wool, 25% alpaca, 25% mohair worsted weight yarn. If you’re knitting the Ribbed Cuff version, you’ll need 1 skein each of 4 colors. If you’re knitting the Cabled Cuff version, you’ll need 1 skein each of 3 colors. In my Ribbed Cuff gloves, I’m using the 4 colors pictured at the right, with the Turquoise Sea color as my main color.

Step 3 – Decide which color will be your main color and contrast colors. Especially if you’re going to knit the Ribbed Cuff version, I recommend drawing a quick map of the glove and where each color will appear in the glove. This will save you time later to prevent you from knitting the wrong color. Believe me, it happens.

Step 4 – Check your gauge by knitting a swatch. Some people swatch, some people don’t. Sometimes it depends on the type of project you’re going to knit. Check out our blog post on Checking Your Gauge if you’re not sure if you think you need to swatch or not. If you do swatch, use the color that appears the least in the gloves you’re knitting.

Step 5 – Get together the other materials you’ll need. After you determine which size needles to use, you’ll need a set of double pointed needles in that size (larger needles) and then a set about two sizes down from there (smaller needles). The recommended sizes are US 5 & 7. You’ll also need a cable needle, stitch holders, and some waste yarn.

Note: if you prefer to knit gloves on two circulars or use one long circular needle for magic loop, go right ahead. I’m finding using two circular needles easier to use when knitting the cabled portion of the gloves since I don’t like it when a cable crosses between two double pointed needles.

Step 6 – Decide which size you’re going to make. This pattern is written in small, medium, and large sizes for women.

Step 7 – Share your color combination and questions. Please share your color choices in the comments below or in the Sebastian Glove KAL thread on Ravelry. And if you have any questions, ask away. That’s what we’re here for.

We’ll start knitting the gloves next Sunday. Then the knitalong will wrap up a week later, which leaves plenty of knitting time left if you’re making them as a gift for the holidays.

I can’t wait to see which color combinations people are going to come up with. This is a great project for trying a color you may not normally use. Have fun with your color selection.

Happy Knitting!
- Dena

Upcoming Events at Kristin Nicholas’ Farm!

Monday, September 10th, 2012
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If you’re a fan of color and Kristin Nicholas, and happen to be within travel-distance of her farm in Leyden, MA, you don’t want to miss your chance to spend a day or weekend with her at the farm. She has three upcoming retreats.

September 15, 2012: One Day Retreat
Colorwork For Advanced Beginners
Lessons include: Knitting on Double Pointed Needles, Knitting with 2 Colors in the Round, Cutting a Steek, Sewing in a Zipper
Find out more about this class here.

September 28/29, 2012: Two Day Knitting Immersion Weekend
Lessons include: Steeking, Fanciful Edgings, Embroidery on Knits, Color, Color, Color
Price includes 2 lunches, one dInner, snacks and beverages, farm tour, hayride and more.
Find our more about this class here.

October 7, 2012: One Day Retreat Sunday of Columbus Day Weekend
Celebration of Color, Flowers, and Embroidery on Knits
Lessons include: Color, Color, Color, Knit or Crochet Sunflowers, Basic Embroidery on Knits
Find out more about this class here.

Make sure you check out these classes. You don’t want to miss your chance to learn from Kristin. She’s a fantastic teacher!

For more information on all of the options for classes at Leyden Glen Farm, click here.

We Have A Winner!

Tuesday, November 10th, 2009
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I am so excited to announce the winner of our “Color by Kristin” giveaway!

Carol O. – you are the winner!  Please email me at kathy.elkins@yarn.com with your address, etc.  Please also let me know which project you would like to make and what size so that I can send you the right amount of yarn!  You can view all of the projects in the book on our website!

As soon as I hear from Carol, I will let everyone know which project she chose!

Thanks to everyone for commenting here on the WEB’s blog and Kristin’s!  We have both really enjoyed reading all of the comments and I know Kristin appreciates all of the love and support of her work

Kathy

Contest Ends Tonight!

Friday, November 6th, 2009
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Our contest with Kristin Nicholas ends tonight at midnight!  If you haven’t already done so, leave a comment here on the WEBS blog and one over at Kristin’s blog.  We’ll randomly select a winner over the weekend and make the announcement next week!

The prize?  Well, the winner will receive and autographed copy of her latest book, Color By Kristin, the yarn for any project in the book – remember – it’s her lovely Julia Yarn too!  Plus we’ll toss in the needles and some other goodies as well!

We’ve had a tremendous response to this contest and I can’t wait to pick a winner!

Kathy

Kristin & Julia

Monday, November 2nd, 2009
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I think I can officially say that this week is unofficially Kristin Nicholas week at WEBS!  With the clocks turning back this past weekend, what a bright and colorful way to face the shorter days!  We have several exciting things going on that I want to share with all of you!

As I mentioned in my previous post, I had the opportunity to talk with Kristin on this week’s episode of Ready, Set, Knit!  Her latest book, Color By Kristin has just been released and it is a spectacular book.  I spoke with Kristin about several of the projects and wanted to share pictures with you.

The Over-the-Top-Shawl is perfectly named:

 

Until you read the fine print (or have a conversation with Kristin) you don’t truly understand how this shawl is constructed.  It is knit in the round.   This not only makes the colorwork easier (I use that term very loosely) to do, but it’s also how the fringe is created.  Yes – once you have finished knitting this drop-dead piece in the round, you steek it and then unravel the steek stitches up to the start of the pattern.  It’s brilliant and terrifying all at the same time.  The finished piece measures approximately 25″x72″ long.  It uses 7 different colors of Nashua Handknits Julia.

The On-the-Go-Knitter’s Tote is a beautiful, functional bag which measures approximately 16″w x 14″ high x 4″ deep when finished:

 

The base is worked back and forth in garter stitch and then the sides are picked up and knit in the round. Eight beautiful colors are used for a total of 14 skeins.

I love the Best Friends Pullovers because the models are true best friends.  Kristin’s daughter Julia on the left and her buddy Bridget is on the right

 

I also just love this photo.  In both cases, the sweaters are worked in the round to the shoulders with steeks used to create the armholes.  The arms themselves are knit in the round and then stitched into the openings created by the steeks.  Both sweaters use 7 different colors.  Both sweaters also feature simple embroidery stitches that really add that extra bit of WOW!

Kristin and I didn’t get to talk about this pattern on the show, but I wanted to highlight it anyway.  I’m rather smitten with the Lazy Daisy Teapot Cozy:

 

I know, knit or crocheted “cozies” are somewhat cliche.  I think this teapot cozy has a tone of attitude.  I also like that although it’s colorful, it’s not knit using any sort of charted pattern.  Once again, Kristin takes this project to the next level with not only the colors she chose, but with the embroidery details she adds at the end.  As we always say at WEBS – it’s all in the finishing – be it blocking, seaming or embroidery.  The final steps of any project are usually what make great projects stand out from the rest of the crowd.

I could easily go on about the other 18 projects in the book (that’s a total of 22), but I’ll let you discover them for yourself.  The first three chapters are dedicated to a discussion by Kristin about using color, the fair isle technique and how to design with it.  There is a ton of valuable information packed into the first 32 pages of this book.

Now, I have a question for you.  How many of you actually clicked on the links I provided for each of the projects?  If you didn’t click, scroll back up, pick one and click through, then come back.  I’ll wait.

Well?  Do you like our new Kit function?  I am over-the-moon tickled with this new feature!   Each project in Kristin’s book can now be “purchased” all at once.  You don’t need to zip around and select the quantity for each of the yarns, then go find the book and then navigate around to the needles.  The kit page features the yarn in each colorway, pre-populated with the quantity for the smallest size or in the case of the shawl, the only size.  The book is listed as are suggested needles.  You can easily “un-select” any item you don’t need, you can change your quanities on the fly or if you want different colors, you can click through and do that as well!  The page will show the total FOR ALL ITEMS SELECTED.  If you change quantities or un-select something, the price will change.  NOTE:  The price is the full price BEFORE OUR YARN AND BOOK DISCOUNT IS APPLIED.  This will happen in the shopping cart.  Remember – everything starts out SELECTED.   You have to buy the book once so you have the patterns.  Once you buy it or if you already have purchased it, you can unselect that option.  Same witht the needles if you don’t need them.

To see what other kits we have already put together you can simply click here or if you start on our homepage, click on “Books, Patterns & Kits” on the top navigation, click on “Knitting” on the left navigation and you’ll see a list of Kits right in the center of the page.  We plan to create these kits for all of our best selling patterns and books.  It’s a lot of work so check back frequently to see what is new. 

We also announced on the podcast we are now carrying Kristin’s yarn Julia.  It is distributed by Nashua Handknits, a division of Westminster Fibers (same folks who distribute Rowan and Gedifra and Kertzer).  Julia is a unique blend of 50% wool/25% mohair/25% alpaca.  Each skein has 93 yards and it’s a classic worsted weight yarn at 5 sts= 1″ on #7 needles.  I realize the fiber content doesn’t sound that special, but it is.  The properties of each of the fibers and how they are blended together are what creates the feel, the drape, the look of the finished fabric in Kristin’s garments.  Plus, she has honed her palette over years.  There are lots of yarns out there with large color ranges, several of our own Valley Yarns included.  But the way her palette works together just simply can’t be found in another yarn.  I am thrilled to be carrying Kristin’s Julia yarn.

Now, onto the festivities of the week ahead.

1.  We will be featuring a trunk show all week of several of the projects from her book.  Be sure to stop in an check them out in person.

2. Kristin will be at WEBS this Thursday night, 11/5 from 6:00-7:30pm for an impromptu Book Launch Party!  She’ll be signing copies of her book, talking about her yarn and will be bringing more garments from the book as well.  We’ll have light refreshments as always.

3.  We’re also having a contest!  What fun would it be if we weren’t giving something away?  Starting today, leave a comment here on my blog and on Kristin’s Getting Stitched on the Farm blog.  Tell us what you think of her book, the projects, how has Kristin inspired your knitting, etc.   The contest starts today and ends on Friday.  We’ll select a random winner who will receive a signed copy of Color byKristin, the yarn for a project of their choice in the quantity for their size (if applicable) and the necessary needles, notions, etc.  Pretty cool, huh?

So, let the commenting begin!  I’d also LOVE your feedback on the new kit function.

Cheers!

Kathy

P.S.  Remember Kristin’s book and Julia yarn are discountable!

Ready, Set, Knit #151 – Interview with Kristin Nicholas

Sunday, November 1st, 2009
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On this week’s episode of Ready, Set, Knit I had the chance to catch up with the fabulous Kristin Nicholas.  Not only is she among the top echelon of the knitterati, she lives right here in our lovely valley.

She has a brand spankin’ new book out called Color By Kristin

Nicholas cover

It’s amazing.  If you’ve been scared of color work, scared of steeks (that would be me) this is the book for you.    Kristin promises to ease my fears and if she can do that – the rest of you are golden because I am SURE I am the biggest scaredy cat among us!

What I am most excited about is that we are now carrying Kristin’s JULIA YARN!  Yes – the rumors are true!  There is no substitute and it’s what she uses exclusively in her designs.  We are stocking every color featured in her new book.   We are thrilled to be partnered with Kristin, her book and her yarn!

Steve also talked about a bunch of yarns! 

Swirl DK from Lorna’s Laces - $6.99 – this is a great new closeout!
Angora Merino from Gedifra - $5.49
Ego Tweed from Schachenmayr - $4.99
Akona from Gedifra - $3.99
Cotton Java Color 4-ply from Regia -  $7.99

Folks – listen to the podcast there are a lot of exciting announcements and I will be blogging about those as soon!

You can listen to Ready, Set, Knit! via our website or you can download the podcast on iTunes.

Enjoy!

Kathy

Interweave Knits Holiday Gifts

Wednesday, October 28th, 2009
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We have just received in the latest “special” issue from Interweave Knits.

This year’s Holiday Gifts issue is HUGE!  It has nearly 60 patterns – twice as many as most issues.  There are lots of great gift ideas, as you would expect.  Many are quick knits others are more involved.   There are several that spoke to me that I’d like to highlight below:

First is the Ripple Cardigan designed by Coralie Meslin and knit in Rowan Kidsilk Haze.

This is a gorgeous cardigan that has a simple style but very interesting construction.  It is knit in multi-directional pieces.  The pattern has 6 sizes and depending on your size, you’ll need 4-7 skeins of Kidsilk Haze.

Next is the Little Majolica by Kristin Nicholas.  Without even showing a picture of this pullover, you know it’s going to be a colorwork masterpiece.

Told you so!  This stranded piece utilizes two colors.  As if that weren’t enough, Kristin introduces a two additional colors by utilizing the duplicate stitch.  Duplicate stitch is one of those underrated embellishing techniques.  I think this garment gives the duplicate stitch instant credibility.  Little Majolica is knit using Kristin’s signature yarn Julia – named after her beautiful daughter.

I’m also lovin’ Slip-Stitch Layers by Simona Merchant-Dest.  Knit in Mission Falls 136 Merino  Superwash, this simple but stylish pullover is absolutely a sweater I would wear.

Unlike stranded work, slip stitch only uses one color per row and the knitter “carries” or “slips” stitches from row to row.  In addition to creating a beautiful result, the fabric is also warm.  Perfect for folks like me who freeze all winter!  Slip-Stitch Layers is generously offered in 7 sizes and requires 7-11 skeins of MC and 4-6 skeins of CC.  Just remember our yarn discounts apply!

The “story” in this issue that really spoke to me was “One, Two, Three” – beautiful projects that utilize 3 or fewer skeins.  Here are the ones that I particularly like.

The Quicksilver Bag by Norah Gaughan.

Really, do I need to say more than that?  Probably not, but I will!  Adorable and functional with a simple construction.  The picture shows the bag as a casual accessory.  With the sheen and texture of Bonsai, I can imagine it sophisticated and dressy as well – change the handles and such and Poof!  A completely different bag.  It would also be beautiful knit in Bonsai Colors.  A great and easy gift too that is affordable!

As I’ve said previously, I freeze all winter.  When temps dip below 70 degrees I’m not happy.  Also well documented is my affection for cashmere.  Let me show you one of the ways I get through our long, cold New England Winters:

Cashmere.Fingerless.Mitts.  The delicate and feminine Wine and Roses Mitts were designed by Jolene Treace and were knit in Jade Sapphire Mongolian Cashmere 2-ply.   That would be One Skein of Cashmere.  I know, times are tight and even one skein of this lovely yarn is a bit pricey at $41.00.   Maybe this is your splurge, maybe it’s the project you find a nice substitution from your stash for.  I love the design and I think we all deserve a bit of luxury if possible.

Next up is a lovely project that features one of our Valley Yarns!  Building Block Scarves by Sarah Hoadley are knit in our Sugarloaf.

Sugarloaf is 52% Merino and 48% Acrylic Microfiber.  It’s super soft, knits at 4 sts/inch and has a nice drape.  I’m tickled with the results!  The construction is pretty neat too.  If utilizes a long cast-on to form the perimeter and then knit in the round to the center and features mitred corners.  Also, if you scroll back up to the cover image, guess what you’ll see!  One of the scarves!  I knew the scarves would be in this issue but I was simply tickled to see one of them on the cover!  Woohoo!  Congratulations Sarah and thank you Interweave!

Last but not least are the Kumara Red Socks.  How could I not favorite a sock pattern?  I think it has unofficially been the year of the sock.

The Kumara Red Socks are a quick knit and will wrap your feet in warmth and luxury.   Kumara is a merino/camel blend from Classic Elite which is super soft and lofty.   These socks only require 2 skeins and what a great gift they will make!  I’m just not sure I’d be giving them away.

I have just highlighted 7 of the 57 projects in this issue.  There are just over 60 days until Christmas (fewer if you are knitting for Hanukkah) and these are all possibilities in that time frame for most of you (some are beyond my reach at this point, but I’m slow and steady so don’t go by me).

I hope these ideas have inspired you!  What do you like in this issue?  Are one of my faves one of yours too?

Kathy