Posts Tagged ‘lace’

Review & Giveaway: The Knitting All Around Stitch Dictionary

Wednesday, May 11th, 2016
Share Button

We love stitch dictionaries here at WEBS and the latest one to arrive is fantastic. Wendy Bernard’s (of Knit and Tonic) newest book, The Knitting All Around Stitch Dictionary is the follow-up to her popular Up Down, All-Around Stitch Dictionary, and features 150 new stitch patterns for knitting in every direction. Not only does it have the stitch patterns and directions, every chapter includes a pattern so you can put the stitch patterns to use! The book is spiral-bound, which makes it incredibly easy to knit from.

The Knitting All Around Stitch Dictionary by Wendy Bernard

As part of the blog tour, we’re excited to be able to share with you not only a stitch pattern from the book, but also a giveaway of the book and 2 hanks of yarn from Blue Sky Alpacas, who provided the yarn for the book.

First things first, the stitch pattern! The Fern Grotto Lace pattern is a lovely pattern that has directions for knitting flat and in the round, both bottom-up and top-down.

The Knitting All Around Stitch Dictionary Fern Lace Grotto Bottom-Up

Fern Grotto Lace Bottom-Up Flat
(panel of 21 sts +1 worked on a background of St st; 6-row repeat)
ROW 1 (RS): *K1, yo, k3, ssk, k10, k2tog, k3, yo; repeat from * to last st, k1.
ROW 2: P1, *p1, yo, p3, p2tog, p8, ssp, p3, yo, p2; repeat from * to end.
ROW 3: *K3, yo, k3, ssk, k6, k2tog, k3, yo, k2; repeat from * to last st, k1.
ROW 4: P1, *p3, yo, p3, p2tog, p4, ssp, p3, yo, p4; repeat from * to end.
ROW 5: *K5, yo, k3, ssk, k2, k2tog, k3, yo, k4; repeat from * to last st, k1.
ROW 6: P1, *p5, yo, p3, p2tog, ssp, p3, yo, p6; repeat from * to end.
Repeat Rows 1–6 for Fern Grotto Lace Bottom-Up Flat.

Fern Grotto Lace Bottom-Up in the Round
(panel of 21 sts worked on a background of St st; 6-row repeat)
ROW 1 (RS): *K1, yo, k3, ssk, k10, k2tog, k3, yo; repeat from * to end.
ROW 2: *K2, yo, k3, ssk, k8, k2tog, k3, yo, k1; repeat from * to end.
ROW 3: *K3, yo, k3, ssk, k6, k2tog, k3, yo, k2; repeat from * to end.
ROW 4: *K4, yo, k3, ssk, k4, k2tog, k3, yo, k3; repeat from * to end.
ROW 5: *K5, yo, k3, ssk, k2, k2tog, k3, yo, k4; repeat from * to end.
ROW 6: *K6, yo, k3, ssk, k2tog, k3, yo, k5; repeat from * to end.
Repeat Rows 1–6 for Fern Grotto Lace Bottom-Up in the Round.

The Knitting All Around Stitch Dictionary Fern Grotto Lace Top-Down

Fern Grotto Lace Top-Down Flat
(panel of 21 sts +2 worked on a background of St st; 6-row repeat)
ROW 1 (RS): K1, *k5, k2tog, k3, yo, k1, yo, k3, ssk, k5; repeat from * to last st, k1.
ROW 2: P1, *p4, ssp, p3, yo, p3, yo, p3, p2tog, p4; repeat from * to last st, k1.
ROW 3: K1, *k3, k2tog, k3, yo, k5, yo, k3, ssk, k3; repeat from * to last st, k1.
ROW 4: P1, *p2, ssp, p3, yo, p7, yo, p3, p2tog, p2; repeat from * to last st, k1.
ROW 5: K1, *k1, k2tog, k3, yo, k9, yo, k3, ssk, k1; repeat from * to last st, k1.
ROW 6: P1, *ssp, p3, yo, p11, yo, p3, p2tog; repeat from * to last st, k1.
Repeat Rows 1–6 for Fern Grotto Lace Top-Down Flat.

Fern Grotto Lace Top-Down in the Round
(panel of 21 sts worked on a background of St st; 6-row repeat)
ROW 1 (RS): *K5, k2tog, k3, yo, k1, yo, k3, ssk, k5; repeat from * to end.
ROW 2: *P4, k2t0g, k3, yo, k3, yo, k3, ssk, k4; repeat from * to end.
ROW 3: *K3, k2tog, k3, yo, k5, yo, k3, ssk, k3; repeat from * to end.
ROW 4: *K2, k2tog, k3, yo, k7, yo, k3, ssk, k2; repeat from * to end.
ROW 5: *K1, k2tog, k3, yo, k9, yo, k3, ssk, k1; repeat from * to end.
ROW 6: *K2tog, k3, yo, k11, yo, k3, ssk; repeat from * to end.
Repeat Rows 1–6 for Fern Grotto Lace Top-Down in the Round.

And now the giveaway! Please comment here on the blog by May 18, 2016 with what you love about stitch dictionaries for your chance to win. Make sure you use your email address so we have a way to contact you and get your mailing information.

Get Schooled

Friday, May 6th, 2016
Share Button

All of the WEBS Summer Classes have opened up for registration, and I love looking to see what gets the fastest sign-ups because it’s different every semester. Last semester, folks couldn’t get enough weaving. Floor looms, table looms, rigid heddle looms, you name it. Weaving is still pretty popular, especially rigid heddle weaving, but I’m happy to see that lots of people are signing up for our beginning crochet classes. I personally don’t think crochet gets enough love, so the more hooks the better! Some advanced knitting techniques are also climbing up the charts, including colorwork and lace.

Knit top-down sweaters that fit, and learn other skills in knitting classes at WEBS this summer. read more on the WEBS Blog at

This inspired me to take a look at some gaps in my own knitting education. I really don’t like lace knitting so much–I get all screwed up when each row has a different stitch count, which can happen in a lace pattern. At this point, with at least one child still around to bother me  ask my advice and sage counsel, I need something that can be abandoned at a moment’s notice and picked up again without having to think deeply about where I ended. I can really get behind the idea of a top-down sweater, as taught in our Top-Down Raglan Sweater From Measurements, mainly because I am short and many conventionally knit sweaters are too big, as in too long and too droopy, in the shoulders for me. A top-down sweater can be tried on throughout the process to make it custom-fit to my shape.

What do you guys think about a top-down summer pullover? The Valley Yarns Park Pullover has my favorite elbow-length sleeves and a dependable stitch pattern for the day after the night I had to help edit a term paper. Knit in Valley Yarns Goshen, a smooth cotton/modal/silk blend on US size 7 needles, this will knit up in a flash and I’ll have the sweater you’ll all be jealous of; one that fits my shoulders AND my waist AND the sleeves aren’t hanging off my fingertips.

What will you challenge yourself to learn this summer?

Bouquet of Hearts Baby Blanket draft designed by Leslie Ann Bestor

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014
Share Button

We began our 40th anniversary series of drafts with a beautiful 16-shaft twill design from Barbara Elkins and end the year with a lovely baby blanket woven on a rigid heddle loom and designed by Leslie Ann Bestor, the new Weaving Manager for WEBS. It is a set of bookends that describes the weaving community in so many ways, touching on the breadth of experience, fibers and looms available.

Draft 12

The Bouquet of Hearts Baby Blanket, woven with Valley Yarns Longmeadow, showcases both the simple beauty of plain weave and the ability to add intricate details that rigid heddle looms do so well. Brook’s Bouquet is a technique of wrapping small bundles of threads to create lace-like windows in the cloth. In the blanket, the motif is a heart, but you can graph out and add your own motif – anything from the baby’s initials to other shapes.

Another key piece of the design, says Bestor, was to encourage weavers to work beyond the width of their looms and weave panels that can be seamed together. The seam can be done by hand or machine, invisibly or as a decorative accent. However it’s done, putting woven panels together expands the width – and the possibilities – of your loom.

Valley Yarns Pattern Feature – The Coppice Cardigan

Wednesday, November 19th, 2014
Share Button

The Coppice Cardigan, in Valley Yarns 2/14 Alpaca Silk, may be one of the easiest lace cardigans there is to knit!

The Coppice Cardigan knit in Valley Yarns 2/14 Alpaca Silk - available at

Kirsten says, “The Coppice Cardigan was a lot of fun to design. It combines one of my favorite Shetland lace patterns (seen with built-in increases in the recent Hazel Shawl) with one of my favorite cardigan structures – the folded rectangle! Funny how a simple, rectilinear shape can create flowing dolman sleeves and a gently curving neckline and hem. It defies all logic, but it’s a shape that seems to fit everyone no matter how big or small you make it! So don’t worry too much about gauge here, and feel free to block it as big as you like to open up the lace.”

Ready, Set, Knit! #287: Kathy talks with Anna Dalvi

Saturday, November 3rd, 2012
Share Button

Play Now:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Kathy and Anna discuss how she got into knitting, designing and writing her own patterns as well as her new e-book, Ancient Egypt in Lace and Color.

Printed copies can be purchased through Cooperative Press.

Anna researched ancient Egyptian art and decided to work with the 6 main colors. She designed two shawls for each color in this collection and let the designs develop from the associated meanings of each.

          Kathy’s favorite design,  Nefer                               Anna’s favorite,  Ra and Apep

Anna also discusses her yarn choices, how designs develop after the materials are chosen and how she works to support many independent dyers and smaller yarn companies.

Check out Anna’s first pattern collection:  Shaping Shawls

Steve’s Yarn Picks

Upcoming Events:
Franklin Habit will be here for classes and an event this week!
Event and book signing with Carol Sulcoski this week, as well!

Right click or CTRL+click and Save As to download the MP3 of this Podcast Subscribe to Ready, Set, Knit! in iTunes Subscribe to the Ready, Set, Knit! Podcast RSS Feed

Tuesday’s Knitting Tip – How to Use a Lifeline

Tuesday, February 28th, 2012
Share Button

Have you ever dropped a stitch when knitting lace?

Do you get lost in your lace patterns? Today’s tip is one you don’t want to miss.

When knitting lace, it can be a big pain trying to fix mistakes when yarn overs are involved. Sometimes you might even find that you get so lost or confused in your lace pattern that it seems easier to just frog the whole project and start over.

But if you use a lifeline, or safety line in your knitting, it can take away a lot of the stress and frustration of mistakes. A lifeline is a way of marking a particular point in your knitting where you can easily rip back to in case you make a mistake. Think of it as knitting insurance.

This video shows you how to insert a lifeline in your knitting and how to rip back to a lifeline if needed.

Use thin, smooth yarn in a contrasting color for lifelines. I like to use crochet thread or cotton weaving yarns. But in a pinch, dental floss also works really well. I mostly use a lifeline in lace knitting, placing it in the last repeat of my pattern. But you can use a lifeline in any knitting project such as cable work or other complicated stitch patterns.

Some knitting needles (Addi Lace Click Long Tips and Knitter’s Pride Interchangeable Needles) even include a hole or slot where you can thread a lifeline through. You’re able to then insert a lifeline into a row as you knit, saving you the step of threading a lifeline through your stitches with a tapestry needle.

If you knit with interchangeable knitting needles, you could use a spare cable as your lifeline. After knitting the row where you want a lifeline placed, replace the needle tips with end caps or stoppers. Connect the needle tips onto a new cable and continue knitting, leaving the old cable in your project as a lifeline.

Lifelines make lace knitting much more fun and relaxing for me. How have lifelines saved your knitting? Share your lifeline tips and stories in the comments.

Happy Knitting!


Free Pattern Thursday:Dandelion Lace Shawl from Classic Elite

Thursday, October 20th, 2011
Share Button

Hi Everyone,

This week’s free pattern is the Dandelion Lace Shawl from the folks at Classic Elite. It is knit in Classic Elite Silky Alpaca Lace. It is a beautiful blend of alpaca and silk that works up into lightweight and airy projects.

The pattern offers three different shawl sizes each taking just one back of the main color and one of the contrasting color. The sample is a size small, which is a great size for a little shawlette or to wear as a scarf. The largest size is 54″ wide and 21 ½” deep at the center point.

The dropped stitches on the lace border are fun. If you’ve ever knit a Clapotis (from, you know how much fun it is to drop stitches on purpose!

I love that you can make this shawl your own by choosing the color you like, or even knitting it in just one color. It would make a lovely gift too, since it is time to start thinking about that. (I’ve already started making a list in my head, we’ll see how much of it I get done.)

Click here for a link to the free pattern. If you’re not already subscribed to Classic Elite’s Web-Letter, sign up. It’s a great way to get a free pattern delivered to your inbox every week!

Happy Knitting!

Free Pattern Thursday: Lace Shawl in Regia Lace

Thursday, September 22nd, 2011
Share Button

Hi Everyone,

The free pattern this week is the beautiful Lace Shawl from Regia.

It is knit in Regia Lace which is a blend of superwash wool and polyamide with a lovely color effect that transitions from color to color. It is a charted pattern, so you’ll want to keep that in mind. I love working lace from charts. To me, it is a great representation of what the pattern looks like and it makes more sense to my brain looking at that rather than a jumble of words.

Click here for a link to download the pattern.

Happy Knitting,


The Buzz at WEBS – September 16, 2011

Friday, September 16th, 2011
Share Button

This week the staff at WEBS is buzzing about…


1. Wendy Knits Lace – I’m a fan of knitting lace and Wendy D. Johnson’s blog, so when this book arrived, I was super excited. There’s a great range of projects – lots of shawls and scarves, but also hats, mittens, socks, and more that use a variety of weights of yarn. I happen to have a rather large sock yarn stash, so I’m looking forward to knocking some of that down with projects from this book (Esplanade Mittens and Mairi Tam, I’m looking at you!) The Vortex Spiral Shawl or Afghan is stunning! Knit in fingering weight, it’s a lovely shawl, but knit in worsted, it’s a spectacular blanket! The first part of the book also features great information for knitting lace – decreases, increases, joining, picking up stitches, and so much more. > Mary K.-H.

2. Jade Sapphire Mongolian Cashmere 4ply – My dreams have finally come true, we have a heavier weight cashmere in a whopping 34 colors. I love everything this company makes, especially their high quality, lustrous cashmere. Customers have long clamored for heavier cashmere in a range of colors, so have at it! > Cara S.

3. I’m excited about Kirsten’s Valley Yarns Silverscape Cardigan. It is such a simple silhouette but with clean, dramatic lace details. I don’t often knit sweaters but I’m working this one up for my Mom for the holidays. > Sara D.

4. Classic Elite Panache pattern book – This is a great pattern book for scarves, shawls and wraps. Different yarns can be used. I made the Grace shawl in Pirouette. It made a lovely lace shawl. > Marion H.

5. When Leslie Ann brought her latest weaving project, I immediately fell in love with her woven set of towels. I love how soft they feel and the beautiful twill pattern repeated in each towel. She put a long warp of Valley Yarns 8/2 Cotton on her loom. And then switched colors of Valley Yarns 8/2 Cotton Linen for each towel. I just happen to have both of these yarns at home and a very lonely loom that would be happy to have a little attention again. > Dena C.

Valley Yarns on Ravelry Issue #6

Sunday, August 7th, 2011
Share Button

Inspired by Cara’s recent blog post Lace Boot Camp, I looked around and found some incredible lace projects on Ravelry in some of our Valley Yarns.

1. Shawl for Pelion knit by Chilicoco uses just a little more than 1/2 a cone of the Valley Yarns 2/14 Alpaca Silk to make the Knitty free pattern Cold Mountain.

2. Spanish Moss knit by hlf in Valley Yarns 2/10 Merino Tencel makes a lovely shawl with great drape. The pattern is available for purchase on Ravelry from Designs by Romi.

3. Rosalind Shawl knit by Fyreball in Valley Yarns 2/14 Alpaca Silk Hand Dyed has a stunning center cable strip that really stands out from the cable pattern. Amazing! The Sivia Harding pattern is also available as a Ravelry download.

4. Wedding Stole for Megan knit by sunfishknitter in Valley Yarns 10/2 Bamboo is a great example of what you can create with a yarn normally intended for weaving, making a delicate lace fabric perfect for an extra special event. Ann Hanson’s Twinings Stole is available as a Ravelry download too.

5. Birthday Marrowstone knit by knittinggolfer with just one skein of Valley Yarns Charlemont Kettle Dyed, shows off the subtle variation you get with a kettle dye yarn. The Marrowstone Shawl is a Marcy Vandale design available for purchase on Ravelry.

6. Graphite Remember Me crocheted by CraftyCSW in Valley Yarns Huntington displays how sock yarn is not just for feet. Great pattern from LilyGo available on Ravelry.

7. Willow crocheted by herbivore100 in Valley Yarns 5/2 Valley Cotton is another good example of what else you can do with our weaving yarns.

8. Down by the Sea knit by donnabriz in Valley Yarns Colrain is a slightly heavy shawl than the others, but equally gorgeous with the oversized scallop edge detail. The Captiva Wrap pattern by Carol Feller is available for download on Ravelry.