Posts Tagged ‘store’

I-91 SHOP HOP IS AROUND THE CORNER!

Thursday, June 11th, 2015
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If you haven’t participated in the Shop Hop in the past years joining in is super easy, all you need is $5 to purchase your passport and a sense of adventure! The I-91 Shop Hop runs Thursday, June 25th through Sunday, June 28th and you can purchase a passport at one of the 12 shops participating this year, and you still have time to purchase your 2015 passport! We are looking forward to welcoming more than 300 Shop-Hoppers to our store over the weekend.

The Annual I-91 Shop Hop is just around the corner. Get your passport now! Read more at blog.yarn.com

Why participate in the Shop Hop? At each store you visit your name will be entered in the daily prize drawing. Each of the daily prizes contains a variety of wonderful yarns, patterns, needles and accessories. Once you’ve visited all 12 shops and have your passport stamped just turn it in at the last shop on your trip and you will be entered into a grand prize drawing! On Sunday, there are two drawings: the daily basket and a chance to win a wooden swift and ball winder.  As an added bonus, each shop will have a special knit kit for sale just for Shop Hop! So be sure to hit all the shops during the long weekend and keep your fingers crossed for the daily prize and grand prize on Sunday. Hope to see you then!

The Annual I-91 Shop Hop is just around the corner. Get your passport now! Read more at blog.yarn.com

Participating Shops:
Green Mountain Spinnery- Putney, VT
Handknits- Brattleboro, VT
Sheep & Shawl-South Deerfield, MA
Northampton Wools, Northampton, MA
WEBS America’s Yarn Store-Northampton, MA
Marji’s Yarncrafts-Granby, CT
Creative Fibers-Windsor, CT
Village Wool-Glastonbury, CT
Country Yarns-Wallingford, CT
The Yarn Barn,LLC-Woodbridge, CT
Knit New Haven-New Haven, CT
The Yarn Basket-Branford, CT

What to Wear This Summer

Wednesday, May 13th, 2015
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If you’ve been to the store within the last month, you’ve seen many new warm weather store samples. For those of you who haven’t visited lately, I want to share some of these spring and summer knits with you. Store employees are modelling their favorite garments of the season.

Spring and Summer knits at WEBS, read more on the WEBS Blog -  blog.yarn.com

Here’s Alyssa modeling the Irokata Tee knit in Plymouth Linaza. This yarn is new this season and contains alpaca, linen and tencel, creating a sultry fabric that drapes with ease. This tunic features thoughtful details and Alyssa likes the shaping that flatters all body types.

Spring and Summer knits at WEBS - Irokata Tee in Plymouth Linaza, read more on the WEBS Blog -  blog.yarn.com

Our Education Manager Amy (formerly a store employee) is rocking the ever-popular Featherweight Cardigan. Our version is knit with Fibre Co. Meadow, a pleasing blend of merino, baby llama, silk and linen which we carry in 15 colorways. The combination of these fibers make the perfect cover up in overly air conditioned restaurants and theaters.

Spring and Summer knits at WEBS - Featherweight Cardigan in Fibre Co. Meadow, read more on the WEBS Blog -  blog.yarn.com

Meg is wearing a sleeveless top  in Sesia Kreo. This 100% cotton yarn is requires a close up look. It’s chainette-constructed, meaning there are lots of tiny strands worked into a tube, which gives Kreo a weightlessness that most cottons can’t boast about. And the strands are subtly dyed which provides the yarn with a warm depth of tone. Meg says Sesia is next-to-the skin soft and easy to wear with a pair of jeans. She also loves the range of colors available.

Spring and Summer knits at WEBS -Women's Shell in Sesia Kreo, read more on the WEBS Blog -  blog.yarn.com

One of our Assistant Managers, Bonnie, has fallen for Tahki’s Philadelphia Duster in their popular yarn Ripple. The thick and thin texture of this 100% cotton yarn gives the garment a light, airy texture, making a perfect coverup for cool evenings. Bonnie loves the mid-thigh length and the short sleeves.

Spring and Summer knits at WEBS -The Philadelphia Duster in Tahki Yarns Ripple, read more on the WEBS Blog -  blog.yarn.com

This next top has become the the most-admired sample in the store.  Worn by our second Assistant Manager Beth, Shibui’s Slope is flattering, stylish and timeless all at the same time. Shown in Shibui Twig, this cool and comfortable shell is perfect over a t-shirt, tank or camisole. Beth says she’d wear it with jeans and flats or dress it up with a skirt and heels. Either way, this beauty is sure to become a warm weather go-to garment.

Spring and Summer knits at WEBS -Slope in Shibui Twig, read more on the WEBS Blog -  blog.yarn.com

Michele sports another Shibui favorite. Shibui Square is knit with a combination of Shibui yarns — Linen and Cima worked together. The side panel is an unexpected detail in this gorgeous piece. Michele loves the drape and lightness the fabric and says wearing this with jeans make the perfect pairing.

Spring and Summer knits at WEBS -Square in Shibui Linen and Cima, read more on the WEBS Blog -  blog.yarn.com

So, what will you choose to enliven your summer wardrobe? I’ve got my eye on the Sesia Kreo sleeveless top and the Irokata Tee. And maybe Shibui Slope. Possibly Shibui Square. I’m not sure. But I do know that there’s not enough time in the day to knit all the things I like!

If you’re traveling anywhere up or down the East Coast, WEBS is on your way! Please come see us soon to check out what’s new.

Knit away!

What we’re working on…and a little something extra

Thursday, April 30th, 2015
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In the store, customers sometimes ask us if we knit.  Rest assured, every member of WEBS store staff knits well and has other craft-y pursuits as well–from crochet, weaving and spinning to tatting and embroidery. And our love of yarn extends well into our non-work hours. Today, I’d like to show off some of our WIPs so you can see what we like to work on in our free time.

WEBS Store Staff Projects Spring 2015 - read more on the WEBS Blog - blog.yarn.com

First up is a gorgeous linen stitch scarf that Carreen’s been knitting.  The yarn, Misti Hand Paint Sock, comes in a wide array of vibrant colors: Carreen chose #57 polar sunset, #56 edible bright, and #58 corked for her version.  She opted to treat the fringe the way weavers do by using a fringe twister, rather than simply leaving the ends loose.  The best part is there’s no real pattern for this scarf–once you find 2-3 colors that inspire you, cast on the number of stitches that will give you the length you want and cast on.  Knit until the scarf is as wide as you’d like and bind off. That’s it!

Mary is currently enrolled in our popular Top Down Sweater from Measurements class and here is her beautiful cardigan knit in the ever-popular Valley Goshen.  Mary wanted a summer sweater in a vibrant color and this project fits the bill.  Although she’s an experienced knitter, she learned a few more tricks in this class–advanced shaping techniques for a flattering fit and designing that fancy, cabled raglan shaping–a design detail that brings an added layer of sophistication to a classic shape.

Marthe is almost finished with a baby blanket she plans to give to a friend.  She decided on Valley pattern #567, the Maria Baby Blanket, and chose Berroco’s Modern Cotton in a gender-neutral color, #1652 Matunuk.  Marthe knit the 8″ x 8″ blocks and sewed them together by working through the back loops of the bound-off stitches which gives the blanket a professional finish. Two more squares to finish and Marthe will be ready to gift a lucky baby with this heirloom.

And finally, Ashley is working on a new shawl which promises to be a beauty.  She’s using a slightly larger needle size to open up the fabric.  Ashley says, “I love how the designer [Steven West] uses geometry and the contrasts of color in such striking ways in his designs.” She can’t wait to see the finished result and we can’t either!

Pretty impressive, eh? We’re are fortunate to have such a talented, smart group of folks here in the store.  Please take advantage of our knowledge and skill when you’re looking for your next project.  We’re here to help!

Jo Sharp yarns available in the US at yarn.com - read more on the WEBS Blog at blog.yarn.com

And now the little something extra…If you haven’t already heard, Jo Sharp yarns and patterns are available after too long of an absence on the American yarn scene.  The best news is that WEBS is the only store in the US that you can buy these sumptuous yarns and classic but stylish patterns. If you’re a long-time knitter, you know what a big deal this is.  If you’re a new-ish knitter, take the time to explore the world of Jo Sharp. You’ll be as excited as we are to have these yarns at WEBS.

Thanks for reading and knit on…

From Afghan to Tunic

Thursday, March 26th, 2015
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In the store’s final salute to National Crochet Month, I’d like to share a terrific garment made by Connie Chisholm. Connie states that she stopped by WEBS to pick up 10 skeins of Universal Yarn’s Classic Worsted Tapestry. This yarn is no longer available, but using Universal’s Classic Worsted will yield the same beautiful results. Originally, her idea was to crochet an afghan. That plan evolved a few times and the final result is a tunic-length pullover which Connie designed herself using a double crochet stitch. You can read all the details about Connie’s first sweater on her Ravelry page.

Customer crochet projects on the WEBS Blog - Read more at blog.yarn.com

Connie says that she loves to crochet because it allows her to design creatively and that “all you need is an idea, patience and time to enjoy the process.” Connie’s garment clearly demonstrates her enthusiasm for crochet and her design skills too.

 

 

Welcome to the store!

Friday, January 23rd, 2015
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This is the store’s first official blog post! Our bi-monthly entries will give us an opportunity to share what’s new and upcoming in the store. If you’re lucky enough to have visited us in the past, you know that WEBS offers a jaw-dropping variety of inspiring yarns, samples and patterns, as well as a helpful and courteous staff to assist you with whatever you want to knit, crochet, spin, felt, or weave. If you’ve not yet made it to the store, I hope that our entries will inspire you to plan a trip to see us very soon.

A customer plans a project with a rainbow of Elsebeth Lavold Silky Wool at WEBS retail store.

We’ve got some exciting and inspiring plans for 2015. We’ll use this space to share what’s new in the store–event and sales, new yarns and patterns we’re excited about, designer trunk shows, current staff projects and more. I’d also like to use this space to show off  some of the beautiful work that you do. Feel free to email me photos and details of your latest creation. Your work could be featured in this space!

I’m so grateful to each of you who’ve decided to make WEBS your LYS, no matter where you live. Please introduce yourself when you come visit.

 

Please send images of projects you’ve completed with yarn or a pattern you purchased at WEBS, and don’t forget to tell me about your projects! to Sgibbs@yarn.com

Are 4 (or 5) Needles Better Than One?

Friday, August 16th, 2013
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Although my poor grandmother tried to teach me to knit when I was nine years old, I had absolutely no patience for fine motor skills at that point, and was much happier playing with her jewelry. I didn’t learn to knit until I was an adult, and I learned very traditionally: straight needles, follow a pattern, make a bottom-up sweater with set-in sleeves and a crew neck. When I started working at Webs shortly after I had gained some mastery of the craft, I was astounded at the variety of designs, techniques, and yarns I encountered. It was overwhelming, but I wanted to try it all. The one thing I stuck to was knitting any sort of tube with double-pointed needles. I honestly tried to use Magic Loop, two circulars, anything but DPNs. However, I don’t love knitting socks ( I have made exactly three socks) and I loved the way my DPNs made hats, baby booties, and sleeves on sweaters look. I’m always on the lookout for really great needles, and I think I have found my DPN mecca: Knitters Pride Karbonz. I recently knit baby sweaters for twins to be born in September, and the pattern was a beautifully easy top-down raglan with the sleeves picked up and knit on DPNs. I did one sweater with my old faithful Dreamz needles, but picked up a set of the Karbonz to try on sweater #2.

Reader, it was heaven.

All kinds’a’Karbonz at Webs!

The Karbonz shaft gripped the yarn just right–it slid easily but didn’t slide off. The tips are sharp and glide-y but they didn’t split the yarn, and there was no discernable bump or glitch at the place where the tip met the body of the needle. Best of all, they look super-badass. Shiny silver tip attached to a matte black needle made me feel a little naughty, even though the project they were attached to was the most adorable peach and lime green baby kimono. Karbonz are available in circulars as well, and we’ve just added interchangeable sets, too. They are well worth the slightly higher price point, and will last until your granddaughters refuse to learn to knit with them.

The Only Library You Can Carry in Your Knitting Bag

Friday, June 21st, 2013
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A knitting teacher in your pocket!

I’m more and more convinced that Knit-Kards™ are the most genius thing ever. Produced by Nancy’s Knit Knacks, which sounds very folksy, these 14 double-sided laminated cards (with handy keyhole and ring included!) contain every piece of information you need to make a sweater, a sock, or a blanket, along with tips and tricks to make that project hum. A long-tail cast-on can be a pain, because what happens when you don’t leave yourself enough yarn to complete the cast-on? You have to rip that sucker out and start over. Believe me, my kids have learned the most choice swears from lurking around my knitting chair. The Long Tail Cast-on Knit Kard™  provides a table with a simple formula to figure out the number of inches of yarn needed based on number of stitches cast on and needle size. Bingo! Job done.

Along with yardage requirements for any kind of garment, from sweaters (baby) to afghans (huge), Knit Kards™ instruct users through Kitchener Stitch, basic increases and decreases, and how to use those increases and decreases for optimum graceful shaping. Yarn Label Guides explain the care symbols used by clothing makers so that your treasured garment doesn’t end up fitting your American Girl Doll. You can convert ounces to grams, meters to yards, and vice versa, learn how to make the perfect gauge swatch, or learn what the abbreviation K1b means. And to top it all off, you get a knitting needle/crochet hook inventory card to keep track of those needles you keep in a plastic shopping bag (Hey! maybe we can talk knitting bags and storage solutions in a follow-up post!). The bright colors make them easy to find in your crowded project bag, and the index-card size makes them convenient to take anywhere.

All the WEBS sales team keep Knit Kards™ in our apron pockets, and we all use them religiously. You should too!