Posts Tagged ‘Tuesday’s Tip’

Tuesday’s Tip – How to Block Colorwork or Lace Mittens

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013
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This week’s tip comes from Sara Delaney, designer of the Valley Yarns Safe Passage Hat and Mittens and Valley Yarns Frost Rime Cowl and Mitts.

When blocking mittens or fingerless mitts with color-work or lace, the stitches may need to be stretched a bit during blocking to settle into shape. Instead of just soaking your project and laying it flat to dry, you can use blocking wires (or long single point needles in a pinch!) to pull the edges evenly. This lets you block the mittens with minimal pin use and virtually no distortion to the pattern!

How to Block Colorwork or Lace Mittens

All proceeds from the sale of the Safe Passage Hat and Mittens benefit Safe Passage.

Tuesday’s Knitting Tip – Wrap and Turn

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013
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If you’re looking for a great handmade gift to give this holiday season, try socks! Socks can be quick and easy while still making a big impact. If you’re new to the world of knitting socks, tackling the heel may be the most intimidating part. Once you master the wrap and turn technique, they’re a cinch! You can see the wrap and turn demonstrated below, and you’ll be on your way to making socks in no time.

Valley Yarns B-3 Basic Socks are a great pattern to get started with if you’re never tried knitting socks before.

Tuesday’s Knitting Tip – How to Select the Right Length Circular Needle

Tuesday, October 15th, 2013
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This week’s tip comes from WEBS Design Manager, Kirsten. She helps us solve the mystery of what length circular needle to use for our projects.How to Select the Right Length Circular Needle

Finding the right length of circular needles can be confusing to even experienced knitters. As a general rule, the length of the needles should be shorter than the circumference of your knitting. You can always scrunch the stitches up on a short needle, but you can’t stretch them out. For example, if you’re knitting a 38″ sweater, you would use 32″ circular needle. Any longer and the stitches won’t reach all the way around, and any shorter wouldn’t leave enough room for the stitches on the needle. Of course, there’s an exception to this rule. You can use a needle longer than the length of your stitches if you’re doing magic loop. With the magic loop technique, you could actually work a hat on 40″ needles.

 

Tuesday’s Weaving Tip – How to Warp a Loom from Back to Front

Tuesday, October 8th, 2013
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In honor of Spinning and Weaving Week, this week’s tip shows us how to warp a loom from back to front. As weavers, we warp much less frequently than we actually weave, and not just beginners need a refresher sometimes. Barbara goes into wonderful detail and has clear, easy to follow instructions to help you get your project started.

Tuesday’s Knitting Tip – How to Kitchener Stitch

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013
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The Kitchener stitch is essential to knitting socks from the top down, and even opens the door to symmetrical shawls and wraps. This technique takes live stitches, and grafts them together in a way that mimics the what a real knit stitch looks like. A properly executed Kitchener stitch looks like it’s not even there! You can see the Kitchener stitch in action below!

Tuesday’s Tip – How to Get the Best Fit for Hand Knit Gloves and Mittens

Tuesday, September 24th, 2013
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How to Measure for Gloves and MittensThis week’s tip comes from our Design Manager, Kirsten. She helps us understand how to get the best fit for our hand knit gloves and mittens

To choose the best size glove to make, you should measure around your hand above the knuckles, including the tip of the thumb, and pick the size that’s closest to this measurement. This will give you just the right amount of wiggle room and help account for the thickness of the fabric. I avoided sizing like that for the longest time, thinking I wanted really snug gloves and mittens, but they never felt quite right until I added the thumb tip.

 

 

Tuesday’s Knitting Tip – Make 1 Left and Right Increases

Tuesday, September 17th, 2013
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There are several different ways to increase in your knitting, but the make 1 increase (abbreviated m1L or m1R) is by far my favorite. The increase is subtle, and the option to have it lean to the left or right helps it blend into your project even better. You can see a demonstration of the technique in the video below.

Make 1 Left:
· Insert left needle from front to back under strand of yarn which runs between next stitch on left needle and last stitch on right needle
· Knit this stitch through back loop

Make 1 Right:
· Insert left needle from back to front under strand of yarn which runs between next stitch on left needle and last stitch on right needle
· Knit this stitch through front loop

Make 1 Purl Left:
· Insert left needle from back to front under strand of yarn which runs between next stitch on left needle and last stitch on right needle
· Purl this stitch through front loop

Make 1 Purl Right:
· Insert left needle from front to back under strand of yarn which runs between next stitch on left needle and last stitch on right needle
· Purl this stitch through back loop

Tuesday’s Tip – How to Fix a Stretched Collar

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013
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The neckline of a sweater can definitely stretch over time, and completely change the look of your garment.

If you have a sweater with a stretched collar, try single crocheting around the top of the ribbing. If you know how to crochet, this is the easiest and fastest method. But if you’re more comfortable knitting, you can also pick up and knit a couple of rows from the top. The new knitting (and the new bind-off) will be a little bit more snug and will help draw the neckline closed again.

Tuesday’s Crochet Tip – Increasing Evenly in Crochet

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013
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Crochet patterns don’t always specify exactly where to work increases. Instead, they may say something like, “Increase 4 stitches evenly over the next 5 rows.” When spacing out increases yourself, it’s best to work them at least one stitch in from the edge of your project. This will make the edges much neater.

In the photo, swatch ‘A’ was worked with the increases at the very end of the rows, while swatch ‘B’  has the increases worked one stitch in from the edge. You can see the difference in how clean the edges look. Swatch ‘B’ is definitely neater finished product.

 

Tuesday’s Tip – Use a Bread Clip to Tame Yarn Tails

Tuesday, August 27th, 2013
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This week’s tip comes from Kerry, one of our fantastic Customer Service Representatives here at WEBS.

Kerry discovered this tip when a customer sent in a partially completed project for us to look at. The customer needed help matching the discontinued yarn the project was made of, but Kerry couldn’t help notice the bread clip used to keep her yarn tail manageable and tidy. She had left an extra long yarn tail to use for seaming when her project was complete.

You could also use bread clips to substitute for bobbins when doing colorwork projects!