Posts Tagged ‘weaving books’

Ask WEBS – small pin loom squares

Tuesday, March 10th, 2015
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Ask WEBS Feb. 24, 2015 - Using pin loom or Zoom Loom woven squares on the WEBS blog - blog.yarn.com

Pin looms, like the Zoom Loom from Schacht, are a great and portable way to satisfy your weaving itch, they’re also a terrific way to use up scraps of yarn! I hear lots of people asking, “But what can I do with a pile of little 3×3″ woven squares?” and the answer is anything!

Ask WEBS Mar 10, 2015 - Using pin loom or Zoom Loom woven squares on the WEBS blog - blog.yarn.com

From simple coasters and fingerless mitts to bags, cowls, shawls and even sweaters, the possibilities are almost endless. Check out the Looms to Go and Zoom Loom Club groups on Ravelry for great project ideas and support or pick up a copy of Pin Loom Weaving or 100 Pin Loom Squares for even more ideas.

Pattern Dictionaries – Springboard to Creativity

Wednesday, February 4th, 2015
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Greetings from the Weaving Room!

As the daughter of a reference librarian, I grew up loving books and using them to learn about the world. It was only natural, then, when I moved into the fiber world to continue to rely on books for knowledge and inspiration. One of my favorite things to do is sit down with a pile of pattern dictionaries and page through them looking for ideas, leaving a path of colorful page markers in my wake.

Weaving pattern directories - available at yarn.com

Weaving pattern dictionaries are books that present a plethora of pattern ideas that you can then use to create a project. They will show the threading, tie up and treadling for one repeat of the pattern and usually include photos of the resulting cloth. Oftentimes you will see multiple variations in treadling or tie up to produce different patterns from the same threading. My favorite books for weaving include the vintage and ever-popular A Handweaver’s Pattern Book  by Marguerite Davison and The Handweaver’s Pattern Directory by Anne Dixon which are both for 4-shaft looms. A Weaver’s Book of 8-Shaft Patternsedited by Carol Strickler is great for the 8-shaft looms and for rigid heddle weavers there is Jane Patrick’s wonderful Weaver’s Idea Book.

Four Shaft Twill Towels, Valley Yarns Draft #33 - available at yarn.com

One of the things I love about these books is seeing the variety of patterns that can be achieved with one threading, just by changing the tie up or treadling. I feel like I’m getting more bang for my warp, so to speak, and can put on a long warp and weave lots of things without getting bored with the pattern. When I designed the Four Shaft Twill Towels (Draft #33), I put on a long warp in natural and then varied things by changing the weft colors and also by changing the tie up. It felt like each towel was new, which kept it fun, and it allowed me to make sets of towels (and you know how much I love sets that are matchy but still uniquely individual!)

Exploring huck patterns with Valley Yarns 5/2 Bamboo - available at yarn.com

Learning this process of translating a weaving pattern into a project draft has been very liberating for me. I often fall in love with the feel of a specific yarn and then get stuck trying to find a draft that fits. Last summer as we prepared for Convergence, I knew I needed to dress a 4-shaft loom for the floor model. I wanted to use our Valley Yarns 5/2 Bamboo which is soft and drapey and perfect for scarves and shawls. I looked through my pattern dictionaries, fell in love with a huck pattern and the result is the Lemongrass Scarf (draft will be available for sale in April).

So cozy up with a good book and start translating inspiration into handwovens! I’d love to see what you create.

The Buzz at WEBS – November 18, 2011

Friday, November 18th, 2011
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This week, the staff at WEBS is buzzing about…

1. These Weaving Journals are blank graph paper pages with a marbled cover in a hardbound format. The marbling and the book binding are done by a local company with one of our reeds! On the inside back cover is a description of how the marbling is done with credit to WEBS for the reed! These would be a great gift. We now also have a Knitting Journal and Blank Journal too. > Barbara E.

2. Great Adirondack Mulberry Silk Roving – This wonderful fiber comes in eight deeply saturated colorways that are a pleasure to spin. The roving drafts beautifully and works into soft, lustrous yarns. Add some to your fiber stash today! > Ashley F.

3. Katia Ondas and Ondas Lux – So last night I took home a ball of Ondas to try out and I’d have to say it is kind of fun! I think that it’s a great yarn for a beginner, like me, who can only knit and purl, and doesn’t care about luxury fibers but wants something that looks fancy. [Don’t miss our video tutorial on how to knit with mesh ruffle yarns.] > KA

4. The Knitter’s Book of Socks – With my ever-expanding sock knitting addiction, this book caught my eye as soon as it came into the store. Clara Parkes has done it again with this book, following the nearly indispensable The Knitter’s Book of Yarn. With thoroughness and engaging writing, this book is a compendium of sock knowledge, orienting one to all the techniques, fibers and tricks to making socks that will not only fit perfectly, but last through a lifetime of wear. > Ashley F.

5. I treated myself to a spinning wheel and a loom last year and both interests have converged in my favorite (so far) holiday gift. I spun the Abstract Fibers Targhee in the Bandon colorway into a worsted 2-ply. I warped my Schact Flip Loom with Valley Yarns Stockbridge in the dark grey and the Bandon became my weft. I used a simple pattern that I learned in Leslie Ann’s Weaving with Pick-up sticks workshop last winter. I LOVE how this turned out! > Sara D.