Posts Tagged ‘WEBS history’

Ready, Set, Knit! 351: Kathy talks with Art and Barbara Elkins

Saturday, April 5th, 2014
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This week Kathy talks with Art & Barbara about the second decade of WEBS’ history.

WEBS former homes copy

They talk about buying their first building, moving their inventory, starting the mail order portion of the business, and the genesis of Valley Yarns.

Steve’s Yarn Picks – the Anniversary Sale!

Upcoming Events:

The Boston Marathon runs on April 21st and you can help the Boston Marathon Scarf Project. They are working towards  providing a scarf for each participant in the marathon this year. Check out the Ravelry group for more details on how to help!

Boston Strong Hat pattern from designer Lisa McFetridge is a colorwork hat design featuring the words “Boston Strong” and the Boston Skyline. Lisa has included additional charts so you have options to really make this hat your own. All proceeds from the sale of this cap pattern will go to OneFundBoston to help the victims.

Join the KNIT-IN with Lisa McFetridge, designer of the Boston Strong Hat, Rebecca Lane of “Blankies for Boston” & the Old South Knitters/Crocheters Saturday April 5, 2014 2-4 pm at the Old South Church in Boston – the church at the Finish Line 645 Boylston Street, Boston – at the Copley T

Have you knit a Boston Strong Hat or a Blanket to donate to a survivor? Do you have a scarf to drop off for the Boston Marathon Scarf Project? You are cordially invited to bring your handcrafted treasures to Old South Church …stay and knit, meet and exchange stories with fellow crafters. If you haven’t begun a hat, scarf or blanket (or two or three), there is still time. A special Boston Strong Hat in progress will be there. Anyone dropping off a hat, scarf or blanket is invited to add a stitch or two to the hat and place their signature on the roll. Truly a group project, this hat will find a special home in the future.

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Show #222: Interview with Margaret from Green Mountain Spinnery

Saturday, June 4th, 2011
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Guest: Margaret from Green Mountain Spinnery, one of the stops on the I-91 Shop Hop. Make sure you don’t miss out on this stop in Putney, VT. It’s a unique experience because all of the yarn they sell is made at their mill in Putney. They are in their 30th year of producing yarns. You’ll also get a chance to see how the yarns are made. All of the yarns are spun in Putney and all of the fibers are grown in the United States, with the focus on New England fibers. At the shop you’ll also find great mill ends and experimental yarns, which are always fun to pick up!

Steve’s Yarn Picks

History of WEBS

Barbara’s “little lie” was that she wasn’t planning on leaving, even though she said she would. It has worked out wonderfully because she has been able to travel, design, weave, and work with our long-time weaving customers.

We’ve gone from three computers to too many to count! We’ve also gone from an informational website to one you can place orders from. No more cutting samples – we have four knitting catalogs and a couple weaving catalogs. The building has morphed quite a bit as well!

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Show #220: Interview with Laura McSweeny from Creative Fibers

Saturday, May 21st, 2011
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Guest: Laura McSweeny of Creative Fibers in Windsor, CT. Laura is the creator of the Shop Hop and she chats about how she came to open her yarn shop. She focuses on changing the negatives she found while yarn shopping and turning them into positives in her shop. The have great classes, a living room with a fireplace, and offer help to customers. They’re also a big part of the community, both locally and across the globe.

Some of the yarns Creative Fibers loves and carries includes a huge selection of Koigu, and Tahki Cotton Classic in over 80 colors! They also stock Jade Sapphire Moonlight. Creative Fibers also has a twice a year retreat.

Make sure you stop by Creative Fibers on your Shop Hop, and if you can’t make it to the Shop Hop, visit Creative Fibers when you can!

Summer Classes are up!

Tina, our Education Manager chats about classes

June 23rd, The Crochet Dude will be here!

Gale Zucker will teach you how to take pictures of your fiber and projects!

We’ve got great crochet classes, knitting classes, spinning class, and weaving classes, plus fiber camp for kids!

Steve’s Yarn Picks

 

History of WEBS

Art taught Business Management at UMASS and retired in 1988 and went to work at WEBS and help it grow. One busy Saturday, Art wanted to use the restroom at the back of the house. He had to physically leave the building and go in a different door! That was the turning point for a move. There was also yarn stashed off-site, which was difficult.

They started looking for new places, and Art brought Barbara to 75 Service Center Rd. and her first reaction was “no way!” It was an old telephone company building that housed trucks and it needed a lot of cleaning. Where our front window and door is now was a garage door. They moved into the building in 1991.

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Show #218: Interview with Vicki Stiefel, Josephine Cardigan KAL, Steve’s Yarn Picks

Saturday, May 7th, 2011
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Guest: Vicki Stiefel, co-author of 10 Secrets of the Laidback Knitter. She wrote this book with Lisa Souza and the whole premise is to help knitters experience more joy from their knitting. The authors wanted this book to be inclusive to everyone. Make sure you check it out!

Also, Vicki will be at WEBS Thursday, May 19th from 5:00pm-7:00pm. If you’re local, stop by and get your book signed.

KAL with Kirsten: Josephine Cardigan

Last show we talked about making the center back cable panel, and now that that’s done, we’re ready to pick up stitches!

Now, technically, the cable could be oriented either with the cast on edge at the neck or at the bottom hem. But I put it at the top neck so it’ll look more like the cables you’re about to do from the shoulders down. This is why you’re doing the right half of the body even though it says you’re picking up on the left edge of the cable panel. By “left edge” I mean the edge that’s at the end of a RS row. After working your last row, your yarn and needles should be poised to start working here, anyway.

When I’m picking up stitches in a bulky yarn like this, I like to go into the edge stitch instead of beyond it so you don’t have a thick seam on the WS. But you can do it whichever way you’re most comfortable. You have to pick up 50 sts in 86 rows here, which is somewhere close to 3 sts for every 4 rows, not exact, but you don’t want to have to cram sts in at the very ends, and I find that the cables can compact the rows a little more than Stockinette.

So, to pick up stitches, hold the cable panel firmly in your left hand, and with your right-hand needle, go into the selvedge stitch, from front to back, wrap your yarn like for a normal knit stitch, and draw the loop through the fabric. You’re essentially treating the edge of your cable panel like it’s a row of stitches on a needle. And if you’re still having trouble, definitely google it, there are lots of videos for you to be able to see it.

Once you’re done picking up those 50 sts, you’re going to cast on 44. How do you do that? Well, there are a few different methods you can use here, but the important thing is to use a cast on that only uses one strand of yarn, not 2 like the long-tail method. I recommend using the backwards loop cast on here, sometimes called an “e wrap” because it looks like a lower case letter ‘e’. I recommend it because it’s easy, it’s somewhat stable, it’s easy to pick up from, which you’ll be doing later, and if you look closely at your long-tail cast on, you’ll see that it’s actually the same as a backwards loop cast on with one row of knitting already built into it. So there’s some symmetry if you use it here.

Steve’s Yarn Picks

Anniversary Sale Highlights

Check out a video of Steve’s Yarn Picks!

History of WEBS

Art & Barbara purchased a large mill end lot of 1300 YPP Rayon Chenille. They then had it dyed and it became one of the first of the WEBS yarns. It was the first time they had repeatable colorways. They were also able to take advantage of mills in the US, which unfortunately, don’t exist anymore.

Barbara & Art used to drive around looking for mills and finding them by looking for water towers. Art made lots of contacts, and now that everything is more precise with computers, mill ends don’t really exist.

Next week – What happens when Art retires his “regular” job.

Also next week, we’ll be LIVE at our Tent Sale, so local customers can catch us on WHMP. The podcast version will go up later than usual.

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Show #217: Interview with Susan B. Anderson, Josephine Cardigan KAL, May Anniversary Yarns

Saturday, April 30th, 2011
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Guest: Susan B. Anderson, author of Spud & Chloë at the Farm and curator of the Spud & Chloë blog, Spud Speaks. If you haven’t checked out Spud & Chloë, take a look at it on our site.

KAL with Kirsten – Josephine Cardigan

Alright, so we’ve got our Northampton Bulky, we’ve swatched and we’ve found the needle size we need in order to get 3 sts to the inch in St st.

Now it’s time to cast on that center back cable panel. Long tail cast on is recommended here because it gives a nice sturdy edge that’s easy to work with. Since you’re at the back neck here, the ribbing will eventually be picked up from the bottom of this cast on edge, which long-tail cast on can handle well if it’s made somewhat loosely. If you love provisional cast-on methods, you can do it here, but keep in mind that you’ll be working some cables as early as Row 2, so you might want to use a method that will give you a row or two of waste knitting to work with, otherwise the cables can distort the cast on edge and make it hard to see which stitches come first.

To work the cable, you’ll have to do a little bit of page flipping at first. The cable panel itself is only 24 sts wide, but you’re casting on 26. That’s because you have a one stitch at the left and right edges worked in garter stitch, which are the edges you’ll be picking up the left and right backs from later. But the other cables at the shoulders don’t need those selvedge edges, which is why they’re not in the chart. So, I show you how Rows 1 and 2 are worked to establish that it’s garter stitch, and you can take it from there, repeating Rows 1-24 of the cable chart, or the written cable directions, your pick, tacking on a little “k1″ at the beg and end of each row.

Just a note about the cable abbreviations: I had to do a bit of translation between the chart’s legend and the abbreviations used in the written pattern. The reason is because my charting software has kind of long, clunky names for cables (probably because it has to have a unique name for so many of them) and they don’t fit very well into written directions and they can be a little hard to read. But since we’re only working with a couple different cables here in this pattern, we can give them more readable, general abbreviations in the written directions. So at the top of page 2, I list what abbreviation means what.

So, we’ll be repeating these 24 rows a total of 3 times, using some of the cable techniques we talked about earlier. And if you’re new to cable charts, not sure if you get them yet, I recommend working from the written version, then comparing each row you’ve worked to the chart, to get a better sense of how it works.

Next show we’ll be talking about picking up the stitches for the sides of the cardigan, casting on in the middle of a project, and just how those sleeves come to be. So get cabling and happy knitting!

May Anniversary Sale Yarns

Weaving Sale Yarns

History of WEBS

In 1983, Art and Barbara opened a second location on Sumner Ave. in Springfield, MA. They closed that store and bought a house in Amherst on Kellogg Ave. and renovated it then moved the store there.

Next week, the story continues with where they went once opened on Kellogg Ave.

If you come into the store during the month of May, you can donate $1 to Cooley Cares for Kids, or $5 and receive an adorable stuffed bear. (Only available in the store.)

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Show 216: Kathy talks with Julia owner of Knit New Haven & Steve discusses new closeouts

Saturday, April 23rd, 2011
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Guest: Julia, owner of Knit New Haven, which is part of the I-91 Shop Hop that’s coming up June 24-26. Julia describes her lovely shop in New Haven, CT. The shop has been open for about a year and a half. It is located downtown within walking distance of Yale. If you can, make sure you make the time to stop by this shop!

Check the I-91 Shop Hop out on Facebook and Ravelry, and Knit New Haven’s website.

KAL: Josephine Cardigan

The pattern can be found here.

It is started with the center back cable panel and then knit out from there.

Skills:
Cables, picking up stitches

Materials:

Steve’s Yarn Picks

Last Week of the Anniversary Sale!

History of WEBS

WEBS moved to 109 Main St. in Amherst. The store was in the basement and the entrance was in the back. Our Fleece Market actually started in the parking lot of this location. It was half and half knitting and weaving yarn. Barbara always talks about how this was a small shop and she had to balance purchasing and the money coming in.

The mail order venture started at this time as well. Art would go out and negotiate for mill ends and samples of the yarns would be cut and mailed all over.

Next Week: The History of WEBS continues, Kathy chats with Susan B. Anderson, KAL continues, more yarn picks and more on the May sale.

Stop into the store to get your I-91 Shop Hop Passport and Tote.

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