May 21st, 2013

Tuesday’s Tip – Blocking over a Plate

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This week, Greta shows us exactly what it means when a pattern says, “Block over a plate.” Now you’ll be able to block your berets and slouchy hats perfectly!

Have you ever knitted a slouchy hat pattern and reached the finishing instructions only to find this strange little tidbit, “Block over a plate”? Now, I absolutely love knitting slouchy hats and berets, but when I saw this for the first time I was a little confused. After trying this blocking technique many times, I finally got it down and thought I would share what I’ve learned.

Materials:
A dinner plate (about 10” in diameter)
A bowl or pitcher, something that balances nicely
About 1 yard smooth scrap yarn
A tapestry needle

Step 1: Using some smooth scrap yarn (about 1 yard) and a tapestry needle, thread the scrap yarn loosely around the brim of your hat getting as close to the edge as you can manage. Technically this step is optional, but I like it because it gives the brim a more finished look and helps open up any lace work in your hat.

Step 2: Block as usual. I wet blocked my hat to soften the fibers and really let those stitches bloom.

Step 3: Place the hat around and over the dinner plate. I arrange it so the crown of the hat is over the bottom center of the plate.

Step 4: Gently and evenly tighten the scrap yarn and tie it in a slip knot. Make sure everything is arranged nice and evenly on the plate.

Step 5: Place the plate brim-side down on an upturned bowl. This keeps your project from getting dirty and helps it dry faster.

Once the hat is dry you are good to go! Wear that slouchy hat with a smile knowing both you and it look awesome!

(Pattern is Crooked Paths by Melissa LaBarre; Yarn is Madelinetosh Vintage in Flashdance)

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Grace

Customer Service Liaison at WEBS - America's Yarn Store
I started working at WEBS in September 2010. I learned how to knit 5 years ago and have been crocheting since childhood. When I'm not knitting, I love to be outside with my Black Lab, Ellie.
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  • Marycrochets

    I think it is funny that in every demonstration of this technique, it is a Corelle dinner plate. I used the technique on my Stellar beret by Linda Permann and I used a Corelle plate too. There must be a lot of those out there just for this purpose. Great demo, and thanks for it.

  • DianeD

    Just in time!I am knitting a slouchy now and was wondering how I was going to accomplish this part of it. Thanks!

  • threadbndr

    I actually use a cake stand to either balance my plate on or just block on the stand – air can get to all sides.

  • crafty.grandma

    One of many mother’s mysteries…what in the world was she doing to my newly knitted beret (!) …sticking a plate in…mom would just smile at me and say – you’ll see…never did see or understand…thanks for the ah ha! moment!!